Articles tagged "history"

BookExpo 2018 Editors’ Buzz Picks

We’re thrilled to have three Macmillan titles chosen for BookExpo’s 2018 Editors’ Buzz panels:

SHE WOULD BE KING by Wayétu Moore
Available September 11, 2018 from Graywolf Press
Adult Editor’s Buzz Panel Selection
Moore’s powerful debut novel blends history and magical realism in a reimagining of the dramatic story of Liberia’s early years through three unforgettable characters who share an uncommon bond.

SMALL ANIMALS: Parenthood in the Age of Fear by Kim Brooks
Available August 21, 2018 from Flatiron Books
Adult Editor’s Buzz Panel Selection
A compelling blend of personal memoir, investigative reporting, and sociological criticism about parenthood and fear—based on a viral essay by an author whose work has been called “striking” (New York Times Book Review) and “beautiful” (National Book Critics Circle).

SADIE by Courtney Summers
Available September 4, 2018 from Wednesday Books
Young Adult Editor’s Buzz Panel Selection
A gripping novel about the depth of a sister’s love, a missing girl on a journey of revenge, and a Serial-like podcast following the clues she’s left behind.

Don’t forget to get your free tickets for “An Evening With Senator Bernie Sanders” (Thursday, May 31 from 6:15-7:15pm), where he’ll discuss his new book, WHERE WE GO FROM HERE.


2018 LA Times Book Prize Nominees

The Los Angeles Times announced their 2018 Book Prize finalists and we’ve got 5 nominees:

Current Interest
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.

LONDON’S TRIUMPH: Merchants, Adventurers, and Money in Shakespeare’s City by Stephen Alford

Graphic Novel/Comics
PRESENT by Leslie Stein

Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction
GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong
HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado readmoreremove

2018 Audie Award Nominees

Listen to this great news: Macmillan Audio has 10 finalists for the 2018 Audie Awards!

Best Male Narrator
GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny, read by Robert Bathurst

I LIKED MY LIFE by Abby Fabiaschi, read by Susan Bennett, Dan Bittner, Therese Plummer

MY LIFE, MY LOVE, MY LEGACY by Coretta Scott King as told to Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds, read by Phylicia Rashad & January LaVoy

TELLING TALES by Ann Cleeves, read by Julia Franklin
GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny, read by Robert Bathurst

Narration by Author or Authors
THIS FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT written and read by Elizabeth Warren

THIS FIGHT IS OUR FIGHT written and read by Elizabeth Warren
GHOSTS OF THE TSUNAMI by Richard Lloyd Parry, read by Simon Vance

ELEVENTH GRAVE IN MOONLIGHT by Darynda Jones, read by Lorelei King

THE BREAKDOWN by B.A. Paris, read by Georgia Maguire

Excellence in Marketing
Get Your Heart Racing Campaign by Macmillan Audio

For a full list of nominees, more information, and to listen to clips from the audiobooks, visit and follow the hashtag #Audies2018.

February 2018 Nonfiction

Nature, history, humor, and sex—just a few of the subjects in this month’s new nonfiction releases:

THE SEABIRD’S CRY: The Lives and Loves of the Planet’s Great Ocean Voyagers by Adam Nicolson
THREE starred reviews! “Marveling at lives lived in some of the harshest places on the planet, Nicolson writes lyrically of birds most of us only briefly notice when visiting a rocky shoreline, beings possessing extraordinary forms of understanding we have never shared.” Booklist, starred review

THE KINGS OF BIG SPRING: God, Oil, and One Family’s Search for the American Dream by Bryan Mealer
Two starred reviews! An indelible portrait of a family through three generations of boom and bust, and a legacy of fortune and ruin as big as Texas itself. “In his themes and vivid storytelling, Mealer invites comparison to James Mitchener (TEXAS) or J.D. Vance (HILLBILLY ELEGY). As tribute to the grit of the rural poor, as social history of dirt-and-oil Texas, and as rambunctious family saga, this work triumphs.” — Library Journal, starred review

LEFT BANK: Art, Passion, and the Rebirth of Paris, 1940-50 by Agnes Poirier
A lively, authoritative group portrait of some of the 20th century’s most revered creative minds as they lived, loved, fought, and flourished in Paris during and after World War II. “This book defies simple description; part collective biography, part cultural history, it aims to make the generation of intellectuals who shaped the Paris of the 1940s familiar to readers. For Francophiles and informed readers interested in 20th-century cultural trends.” — Library Journal

OPERATION CHAOS: The Vietnam Deserters Who Fought the CIA, the Brainwashers, and Themselves by Matthew Sweet
An untold Cold War story about how the CIA tried to infiltrate a radical group of U.S. military deserters; a tale that leads from a bizarre political cult to the heart of the Washington establishment. “A surprising, tragic, and, in many places, angry story of a country’s paranoia inflicting itself upon its own citizens.” — Booklist readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Superstars!

TGIF! Our #FridayReads are forthcoming books with several starred reviews!

THE MERRY SPINSTER by Mallory Ortberg
“Unlike most modern versions of fairy tales, Ortberg’s sly, scathing renditions avoid clichés and self-referential edginess, and instead strike directly at the heart. The book brings the shock of the new and the shock of recognition into play at the same time; it’s a tour de force of skill, daring, and hard-earned bravura.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“A wholly satisfying blend of silliness, feminist critique, and deft prose makes this a collection of bedtime stories that will keep you up at night for all the right reasons.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

A DEATH OF NO IMPORTANCE by Mariah Fredericks
“Jane is an appealing amateur sleuth, an orphan exposed to the excesses of the wealthy while remaining friends with union organizers and anarchists. With its vivid depiction of contrasting worlds this series debut should appeal to readers of Alyssa Maxwell’s ‘Gilded Age’ historical mysteries.” — Library Journal, starred review

“The novel’s voice, plotting, pace, characterization, and historical background are all expertly crafted, while the resolution—which feels both surprising and convincing—will leave readers hungry for more.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

November 2017 Nonfiction

November brings a bounty of excellent new nonfiction to your library’s shelves!

PROMISE ME, DAD: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose by Joe Biden
The vice president pens a deeply moving memoir about the most challenging professional and personal year in which he lost his son to brain cancer. “The book is a backstage drama, honest, raw and rich in detail. People who have lost someone will genuinely take comfort from what he has to say….” — New York Times

PRAIRIE FIRES: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser
A November 2017 LibraryReads pick & New York Times Notable Book of 2017! “The sesquicentennial observance of the birth of the author of the celebrated Little House books (65 million copies sold in 45 languages) has been the catalyst for the publication of a spate of books, now including this magisterial biography, which surely must be called definitive. Richly documented…. But it is its marriage of biography and history—the latter providing such a rich context for the life—that is one of the great strengths of this indispensable book, an unforgettable American story.” — Booklist, starred review

THE WINE LOVER’S DAUGHTER: A Memoir by Anne Fadiman
A Library Journal Best Book of 2017 and a November 2017 Indie Next pick! With all her characteristic wit and feeling, celebrated essayist Fadiman examines her relationship with her father, Clifton Fadiman, a renowned literary critic, editor, and radio host whose greatest love was wine. “In this crisp, scintillating, amusing, and affecting memoir, Anne incisively and lovingly portrays her brilliant and vital father and brings into fresh focus the dynamic world of twentieth-century books and America’s discovery of wine.” — Booklist, starred review

Also available in audio
Tina Brown kept delicious daily diaries throughout her eight spectacular years as editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair. Today they provide an incendiary portrait of the flash and dash and power brokering of the Excessive Eighties in New York and Hollywood. “High and low, perceptive and prescient (in 1987, she speculated that the American public won’t be able to resist the crassness of Donald Trump), this is a wildly entertaining, essential look at print journalism before the fall.” — Booklist, starred & signature review

SECRECY WORLD: Inside the Panama Papers Investigation of Illicit Money Networks and the Global Elite by Jake Bernstein
“Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Bernstein, a reporter with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, recounts the story that the millions of documents leaked from a Panamanian law firm tell about how corporations and wealthy individuals hide their money in offshore accounts. …Bernstein does first-rate work in providing a map to a scandal that has yet to unfold completely.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

2017 Goodreads Choice Awards

Goodreads launched their annual Choice Awards yesterday and Macmillan has a whopping 47 nominees in the running! Click here to vote for your favorites and we’ll keep you updated as the tournament progresses.

Voting Schedule
Opening Round: Oct. 31 – Nov. 5
Semifinal Round: Nov. 7 – 12
Final Round: Nov. 14 – 27
Winners Announced: Dec. 5

Final Round Nominees

As of Nov. 14 we have 20 books still in the running!

Mystery & Thriller
GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny
THE DRY by Jane Harper

OATHBRINGER by Brandon Sanderson

COME SUNDOWN by Nora Roberts

Science Fiction
BINTI: HOME by Nnedi Okarafor
BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer


Memoir & Autobiography
THE FACT OF A BODY by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

History & Biography
APOLLO 8 by Jeffrey Kluger

Science & Technology
OTHER MINDS by Peter Godfrey-Smith

Food & Cookbooks

Debut Author
THE DRY by Jane Harper
CARAVAL by Stephanie Garber

Young Adult Fantasy & Science Fiction
CARAVAL by Stephanie Garber

Semifinal Round Nominees

THIS IS HOW IT ALWAYS IS by Laurie Frankel
SOURDOUGH by Robin Sloan

Mystery & Thriller
BEHIND HER EYES by Sarah Pinborough
NEVER LET YOU GO by Chevy Stevens


Science Fiction
ALL SYSTEMS RED by Martha Wells

THE DELIRIUM BRIEF by Charles Stross
THE GRIP OF IT by Jac Jemc

I NEED A LIFEGUARD EVERYWHERE BUT THE POOL by Lisa Scottoline & Francesca Serritella

TEARS WE CANNOT STOP by Michael Eric Dyson

Memoir & Autobiography
I WAS TOLD TO COME ALONE by Souad Mekhennet
VOICE LESSONS by Cara Mentzel
HAPPINESS by Heather Harpham

Fall for Nonfiction

Fall for nonfiction with new books from Bill O’Reilly and Russell Brand, plus a couple of excellent memoirs:

KILLING ENGLAND: The Brutal Struggle for American Independence by Bill O’Reilly, Martin Dugard
O’Reilly and Dugard’s bestselling history series continues with the story of the Revolutionary War, told through the eyes of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Great Britain’s King George III.

RECOVERY: Freedom from Our Addictions by Russell Brand
A guide to all kinds of addiction from a star who has struggled with heroin, alcohol, sex, fame, food, and eBay that will help addicts and their loved ones make the first steps into recovery.

THE BEST OF US: A Memoir by Joyce Maynard
A touching memoir chronicling Maynard’s second marriage. “This haunting story, penned by a master wordsmith, is a reminder to savor every loved one and every day.” — Booklist, starred review

RIOT DAYS by Maria Alyokhina
A Pussy Rioter’s riveting, hallucinatory account of her years in Russia’s criminal system and of finding power in the most powerless of situations… “An inspirational memoir about youthful idealism and the power of popular culture to challenge the status quo.” — Kirkus Reviews


New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

Memorial Day Weekend 2017 Reading Roundup

Memorial Day weekend is here (hooray!) and we’re stacking our to-read piles with these major media-recommended books:
Entertainment Weekly — Summer’s Must-Read Books

BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki
Cartoonist Tamaki dazzles with her impressive range in this collection, marrying each short story to a different artistic style. Whether she’s writing and drawing about the pitfalls of technology or ruminating on nostalgia, her work is lush, vibrant, and packed with emotion.

LIFE IN CODE by Ellen Ullman
Ullman, a computer programmer since the ’70s, expands on the themes she covered in 1997’s CLOSE TO THE MACHINE with pieces about what it was like on the forefront of the tech revolution, being a woman in a male-donimated industry, and how the tech landscape has (and hasn’t) changed.

In Ginder’s glitzy beach read, things spiral out of control in the days leading up to a wedding as a charmingly dysfunctional family—brimming with oddball stepsiblings—does everything it can to sabotage the nuptials.

The New York TimesSummer Reading Recommendations, From Novelists Who Own Bookstores

Jonathan Lethem, author of A GAMBLER’S ANATOMY & owner of Red Gap Books, a used and rare bookstore in Blue Hill, ME recommends BROKEN RIVER by J. Robert Lennon
“It’s a tense, surprising thriller, with perverse overtones of the Coen brothers variety, but containing an enigmatic narrative device, a kind of ‘haunting of the point-of-view’ – one which proves, as ever, that the novel can do things nothing but the novel can do. I’m almost ready to reread it.”

Jeff Kinney, author of the bestselling “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” series and owner of An Unlikely Story in Plainville, MA recommends RADICAL CANDOR by Kim Scott (“Scott’s experiences leading teams at Google and Apple led to this book, which espouses a workplace culture where leaders care deeply about their employees and challenge them to be their best selves.”) and BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer (“The cover alone had me hooked. Is the protagonist a plant? An animal? Something in between?”).

Louise Erdrich, author of LAROSE & owner of Birchbark Books in Minneapolis, MN recommends THE SONG POET by Kao Kalia Yang
“The exquisite story of Kao Kalia Yang’s father, village life, war life, refugee life, then a St. Paul housing project; America’s secret war in Laos; and a people’s history as sung by Bee Yang and remembered in fascinating and poetic detail by his daughter.”

Buzzfeed’s “Thrillers You Will Devour This Summer

IT’S ALWAYS THE HUSBAND by Michele Campbell
Fans of Ruth Ware and Gillian Flynn meet your next obsession. Kate, Aubrey, and Jenny were inseparable in college. 20 years later, one of them is found dead. How did it come to this? Alternating between their college years and the present day, readers slowly come to realize that their friendship was anything but perfect. But can feelings that strong really lead to murder, or will everyone assume, as is often the case, that it’s always the husband? Only one way for you to find out… readmoreremove