Articles tagged "Guy Delisle"

NPR’s 2017 Book Concierge Picks

NPR’s Book Concierge is live and it includes nearly 50 Macmillan titles!!

300 ARGUMENTS: Essays by Sarah Manguso
4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster
AFFLUENCE WITHOUT ABUNDANCE: The Disappearing World Of The Bushmen by James Suzman
AGE OF ANGER: A History Of the Present by Pankaj Mishra
THE ANSWERS by Catherine Lacey
AUTONOMOUS by Annalee Newitz
BAKING WITH KAFKA by Tom Gauld
BASED ON A TRUE STORY by Delphine de Vigan
THE BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY AND THE MIDDLE KINGDOM: America And China, 1776 To The Present by John Pomfret
BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki
BUNK: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, And Fake News by Kevin Young
THE BUTCHERING ART: Joseph Lister’s Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine by Lindsey Fitzharris
DARE NOT LINGER: The Presidential Years by Nelson Mandela and Mandla Langa
THE DARK DARK by Samatha Hunt
DRAFT NO. 4: On The Writing Process by John McPhee
THE DRY by Jane Harper
EAT ONLY WHEN YOU’RE HUNGRY by Lindsay Hunter
FEN: Stories by Daisy Johnson
FIRE!!: The Zora Neale Hurston Story by Peter Bagge
FRESH COMPLAINT: Stories by Jeffrey Eugenides
GHOSTS OF THE TSUNAMI: Death And Life In Japan’s Disaster Zone by Richard Lloyd Parry
GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny
GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong
HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado
HOSTAGE by Guy Delisle
ISADORA by Amelia Gray
KEEPING ON KEEPING ON by Alan Bennett
THE LAST KID LEFT by Rosecrans Baldwin
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman, Jr.
LOTUS by Lijia Zhang
MARLENA by Julie Buntin
MY LESBIAN EXPERIENCE WITH LONELINESS by Nagata Kabi
MY LIFE, MY LOVE, MY LEGACY by Coretta Scott King, as told to Barbara Reynolds
THE NINTH HOUR by Alice McDermott
ONE DAY WE’LL ALL BE DEAD AND NONE OF THIS WILL MATTER by Scaachi Koul
RIVER OF TEETH by Sarah Gailey
THE SEVENTH FUNCTION OF LANGUAGE by Laurent Binet
SOURDOUGH by Robin Sloan
TOO MUCH AND NOT IN THE MOOD: Essays by Durga Chew-Bose
TWIN PEAKS: THE FINAL DOSSIER by Mark Frost
UNIVERSAL HARVESTER by John Darnielle readmoreremove

Chicago Public Library’s “Best of the Best Books of 2017”

We’ve got 15 books on Chicago Public Library’s “Best of the Best Books 2017” list! Selected by a team of CPL librarians, the list represents the year’s most outstanding titles, books of exceptional quality for a diverse, city-wide readership.

Fiction
BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
THE DRY by Jane Harper
GOOD ME, BAD ME by Ali Land
GRIEF COTTAGE by Gail Godwin
HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado
LILLIAN BOXFISH TAKES A WALK by Kathleen Rooney
THE NINTH HOUR by Alice McDermott
SOURDOUGH by Robin Sloan
THIS IS HOW IT ALWAYS IS by Laurie Frankel

Nonfiction
BUNK: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News by Kevin Young
THE FACT OF A BODY: A Murder and a Memoir by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich
NOTES ON A FOREIGN COUNTRY: An American Abroad in a Post-American World by Suzy Hansen
TEARS WE CANNOT STOP: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson readmoreremove

Books for Teens 2018 + “Day’s YA!”

Welcome to the 2018 Books for Teens post!

I am Emily Day, Macmillan’s Library Marketing Assistant / YA Specialist and your host and curator of this post. I recently moved to NYC from Boston, where I worked as a bookseller at Trident Booksellers and Cafe, an intern at Charlesbridge Publishing and the Horn Book, and a children’s literature graduate student at Simmons College. If I’m listening to music, it’s probably a Broadway musical soundtrack, I love and collect maps, and I prefer cold, cloudy days to warm, sunny ones. I read YA almost exclusively, and some of my all-time favorites are WORDS IN DEEP BLUE by Cath Crowley, ARISTOTLE AND DANTE DISCOVER THE SECRETS OF THE UNIVERSE by Benjamin Alire Sáenz, I’LL GIVE YOU THE SUN by Jandy Nelson, INSIDE OUT & BACK AGAIN by Thanhha Lai, and ANNE OF GREEN GABLES by L.M. Montgomery (technically those last two aren’t YA, but they’re just so spectacular that I had to list them).

In addition to featuring forthcoming YA and YA-ok titles from Wednesday Books and Flatiron Books YA, I will also include my candid reviews of as many titles as I can possibly read (starting with two of my absolute faves, Melissa Albert’s THE HAZEL WOOD and Adrienne Young’s SKY IN THE DEEP), which will be labeled as “Day’s YA!” [GET IT? HA!] So, when you’re ready to scroll, stories of Vikings and Valkyries, hospitals and heartthrobs, mental illness and fighting back, all await you below.

Ready? Here we go!

First, make sure that you’re pre-approved on Edelweiss to download all of our available e-galleys, including many of the titles mentioned below. Click here to find out how to be whitelisted.

You can also view our Edelweiss collection of Books for Teens 2018 titles here.

Now on to the books!

MIRAGE by Somaiya Daud
9781250126429
Available August 28, 2018 from Flatiron Books
Ages 13 to 18
Also available in audio

Star Wars meets RED QUEEN and THE WRATH AND THE DAWN in this epic fantasy inspired by the author’s Moroccan heritage about Amani, a poor girl who must become the body double of a princess of a ruthless empire. As Amani is forced into her new role, she can’t help but enjoy the palace’s beauty and her time with the princess’ fiancé, Idris. But the glitter of the royal court belies a world of violence and fear. If Amani ever wishes to see her family again, she must play the princess to perfection . . . because one wrong move could lead to her death.

“Daud’s gorgeously written novel features lush and poetic language that brings the setting into vivid color. In addition to the blend of [science fiction] and fantasy, Daud supplies a dash of forbidden romance destined to leave the reader gasping for breath.” —Booklist, starred review

” . . . readers will appreciate the rich world and prose built by a much-needed diverse voice.” —Kirkus Reviews

SADIE by Courtney Summers
9781250105714
Available September 4, 2018 from Wednesday Books
Ages 13 to 18

SADIE is the story of a missing girl on a journey of revenge and a Serial-like podcast following the clues she’s left behind. When Sadie’s little sister, Mattie, is found dead, Sadie hits the road on a mission to find her sister’s killer. But when West McCray—a radio personality working on a segment about small, forgotten towns in America—overhears Sadie’s story at a local gas station, he becomes obsessed with finding the missing girl. He starts his own podcast as he tracks Sadie’s journey, trying to figure out what happened, hoping to find her before it’s too late.

“Sadie is smart, observant, tough, and at times heartbreakingly vulnerable, her interactions mediated by a profound stutter. In the podcast, characters first seen through Sadie’s ruthless eyes further reveal (or conceal) their interactions and motives.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

THE HAZEL WOOD by Melissa Albert
9781250147905
Available now from Flatiron Books
Ages 12 to 18
Also available in audio
SIX starred reviews!!

Day’s YA Review:
Reminiscent of Emily Carroll’s THROUGH THE WOODS and Emma Donoghue’s KISSING THE WITCH, Melissa Albert has hit the nail on the head with this spooky homage to fairy tales. Though Albert’s novel is not a retelling of a classic fairy tale, she has managed to create a completely original narrative filled with riveting characters and a captivating plot that still retains some of the elements of more traditional tales. THE HAZEL WOOD is an obvious choice for lovers of fantasy novels and classic fairy tales, but it will also appeal to fans of YA mystery novels, such as E. Lockhart’s WE WERE LIARS, and stories about the discovery of deep, personal truths, such as Nicola Yoon’s EVERYTHING EVERYTHING. Albert’s enchanting debut novel is truly something special and will leave you with the lingering notion that our stories are all around us, influencing us and comprising our most inner beings. Click here to read the full review.

LEGENDARY by Stephanie Garber
9781250095312
Available now from Flatiron Books
Ages 13 to 18
Also available in audio

In the sequel to the New York Times bestselling and #1 IndieNext Pick CARAVAL, Stephanie Garber’s limitless imagination takes flight once more. This year’s Caraval has concluded and Tella is alive—and safe, to her older sister’s relief. But Tella has secrets she has been keeping from Scarlett. Afraid of revealing the truth to the person who loves her most, Tella runs away to Valenda, the capital of the Empire, to find the mysterious correspondent whom Tella owes.

“The pacing is impeccable, with urgency increasing to an almost breathless point as Tella runs from clue to clue, while bittersweet truths and devastating betrayals unfold.” —The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, starred review

” . . . a tour de force of imagination.” —Kirkus

“Fans will be delighted to spend more time with Tella, Dante, and Scarlett, and to immerse themselves again into Garber’s magical world.” —School Library Journal

CARAVAL by Stephanie Garber (ages 13 to 18) is available now in trade paperback.
9781250095268

SKY IN THE DEEP by Adrienne Young
9781250168450
Available now from Wednesday Books
Ages 12 to 18
Also available in audio

Day’s YA Review:
As soon as I reached the last page of this novel, I wanted to go back and start from the beginning again just so I could continue to be wrapped up in Young’s words. Know her characters. Experience the world she created. The character of Eelyn is a badass warrior heroine who will appeal to fans of Marvel’s Wonder Woman, as well as Disney’s Brave and Tamora Pierce’s Alanna series. Eelyn is simultaneously fierce and sensitive; she loves deeply, but she is also able to instantly take someone down with her axe. Adrienne Young’s debut novel is written with the finesse of a veteran author, and to give you a taste of her brilliance I’m going to leave you with a quote from the second page of the book that captures the emotion and voice of the novel:

“Vegr yfir fior. Honor above life. The first whistle cut into the air from our right, warning us to get ready and I closed my eyes, feeling the steadiness of the earth beneath my feet. The sounds of battle rushing toward us bled together as the deep-throated prayers of my clansmen rose up around me like smoke from a wildfire. I let the words march out under my breath, asking Sigr to guard me. To help me bring down his enemies.”

Click here to read the full review.

And now, a word from debut author, Adrienne Young:

Dear Librarians,

As story gatekeepers, I know the role you play in a book’s life and in the life of young people is invaluable. That’s why I am so excited for you to meet Eelyn, a fierce, but deep warrior whose life is about to change forever. In many ways, her journey reflects my own and I know that there are teens out there who will find a mirror in these pages. What I hope girls see in this book is the message that I wish had been given to me—that you don’t have to apologize for strength and passion and that you don’t have to be either hard or soft, but that you can be both. You can fight fiercely and you can love deeply. Most importantly, that you can dare to see the world differently than the way you always have. And that even though it’s scary, it’s absolutely thrilling to open your eyes for the first time. Eelyn will be forced to confront everything she’s ever been taught. She will have to grieve, learn to love, and redefine what family, loyalty, and forgiveness is.

I hope you are swept away with Eelyn as she runs straight into battle, headed toward a future she could never have imagined!

Thank You,
Adrienne Young

“A rousing saga and moving coming-of-age tale, perfect for those who appreciate the wild and the wildlings, strong female protagonists, and cinematic battles.” —Kirkus, starred review

“The action on the battlefield and the rising political tensions between the clans will easily keep readers involved through the final page.” —The Bulletin for the Center of Children’s Books, review

“A refreshing tale where life is tested and people have to overcome their differences to fight a bigger foe to survive. A fast-paced, action-filled fantasy for all YA collections.” —School Library Journal, review

“With its gorgeous prose and epic battle scenes, fantasy lovers will be easily satisfied.” —Booklist, review

“Young’s often poetic writing forms a stark juxtaposition with her vivid descriptions of battle and bloodshed, creating a clear picture of the brutality of war.” —Publishers Weekly, review

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New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

PW Spring 2017 Announcements

Publishers Weekly looked into their crystal ball and predicted that these 98(!) Macmillan adult books will stand out in the first half of 2017:
Art, Architecture & Photography (full list)

THE SAGRADA FAMILIA: The Astonishing Story of Gaudí’s Unfinished Masterpiece by Gijs van Hensbergen
Out: July 25
This book chronicles the story of architect Antoni Gaudí’s strange masterpiece, which has remained under construction for the past 130 years, as well as the building’s complicated relationship with the city and residents of Barcelona.

YOUNG LEONARDO: The Evolution of a Revolutionary Artist, 1472–1499 by Jean-Pierre Isbouts and Christopher Heath Brown
Out: May 23
A study of Leonardo da Vinci’s formative years, his triumphs and failures in the Renaissance art world, and how his techniques developed into the style he’s famous for today.

Business & Economics (full list)

GLASS HOUSE: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town by Brian Alexander (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 14
Alexander examines how the purchase of the Anchor Hocking Glass Company by a private equity firm all but destroyed the company and the town of Lancaster, Ohio.

DROP THE BALL: Achieving More by Doing Less by Tiffany Dufu
Out: Feb. 14
Dufu recounts how she learned to reevaluate expectations, shrink her to-do list, and meaningfully engage the assistance of others—freeing the space she needed to flourish at work and to develop deeper, more meaningful relationships at home. Foreword by Gloria Steinem.

THE COMPLACENT CLASS: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream by Tyler Cowen
Out: Feb. 28
The well-known blogger, economist, and author argues that by relying on algorithms that wall Americans off from anything that might be too new or different, we postpone necessary change, which will lead to major fiscal and budgetary crisis.

Comics & Graphic Novels (full list)

BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki (a Top 10 pick)
Out: June 6
With masterful art and evocative storytelling, Tamaki’s short stories tackle subjects from bedbugs to the addictive nature of pop culture to pornography.

PALOOKAVILLE #23 by Seth (a Top 10 pick)
Out: May 30
Seth’s been writing his massive story of the Matchcard brothers and their failing fan company since 1998, and it finally winds up in this book.

THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS WRONG by Mimi Pond
Out: Apr. 18
Pond’s autobiographical story continues with the saga of a naive young artist working in a restaurant full of drunks, junkies, thieves, and creeps. Pond folds their tales into her own emergence as an artist in the scuzzy, low-rent war zone of late 1970s Oakland.

HOSTAGE by Guy Delisle
Out: May 2
In the middle of the night in 1997, Doctors Without Borders administrator Christophe André was kidnapped by armed men and kept prisoner for three months in the Caucasus. Award-winning cartoonist Delisle recounts André’s harrowing experiences.

Cooking & Food (full list)

KNIFE: Steakhouse Meals at Home by John Tesar (a Top 10 pick)
Out: May 2
Bravo’s Top Chef contestant celebrates steak in every form, with recipes for popular cuts.

RIVER COTTAGE A TO Z: Our Favourite Ingredients, & How to Cook Them by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Pam Corbin, Mark Diacono, Nikki Duffy, Nick Fisher, Steven Lamb, Tim Maddams, Gill Meller, and John Wright
Out: May 2
An authoritative encyclopedia of more than 300 ingredients and 300 recipes, set to become a solid addition to the River Cottage library.

THE BUTCHER BABE COOKBOOK: Comfort Food Hacked by a Classically Trained Chef by Loreal Gavin
Out: Apr. 25
A quirky Food Network chef elevates classic cooking techniques with eclectic, rock ’n’ roll twists.

AN AMERICAN GIRL IN LONDON: 101 Nourishing Recipes for Your Family from a Californian Expat by Marissa Hermer
Out: Apr. 4
The restaurateur and star of Bravo’s Ladies of London provides nourishing, family-friendly recipes inspired by her Californian childhood and current British lifestyle.

FABIO’S 30-MINUTE ITALIAN: Over 100 Fabulous, Quick, and Easy Recipes by Fabio Viviani
Out: May 2
The bestselling author of FABIO’S ITALIAN KITCHEN presents a collection of recipes with tips and inspiration for making great Italian food in no time.

Essays & Literary Criticism (full list)

THE NOVEL OF THE CENTURY: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables by David Bellos (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Mar. 7
Bellos recounts the birth and many later lives of one of the world’s most popular novels.

AMERICAN ORIGINALITY: Essays on Poetry by Louise Glück
Out: Mar. 14
The poet’s second book of essays, after 1993’s PROOFS AND THEORIES, focuses on contemporary American poetry.

HOUSMAN COUNTRY: Into the Heart of England by Peter Parker
Out: June 20
This book investigates the particularly English sensibility of poet and classical scholar A.E. Housman (1859–1936), best remembered for the collection A SHROPSHIRE LAD, published in 1896.

TOO MUCH AND NOT IN THE MOOD: Essays by Durga Chew-Bose
Out: Apr. 11
Inspired by Virginia Woolf’s April 11, 1931, entry in A WRITER’S DIARY, Chew-Bose makes a self-portrait of a young writer shutting out the din in order to find her own voice.

THE WORLD BROKE IN TWO: Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster and the Year that Changed Literature by Bill Goldstein
Out: July 4
A narrative of the intersecting lives and works of four revered authors during 1922, the birth year of modernism.

ONE DAY WE’LL ALL BE DEAD AND NONE OF THIS WILL MATTER: Essays by Scaachi Koul
Out: May 2
A debut collection about growing up the daughter of Indian immigrants, addressing sexism, cultural stereotypes, and the universal miseries of life.

History (full list)

CAUGHT IN THE REVOLUTION: Petrograd, Russia, 1917—A World on the Edge by Helen Rappaport (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
The author of THE ROMANOV SISTERS relates the outbreak of the Russian revolution through eyewitness accounts left by foreign nationals who saw the drama unfold.

LENIN ON THE TRAIN by Catherine Merridale (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Mar. 28
A celebrated scholar of Russian history offers an account of Lenin’s 1917 rail trip from Zurich to Petrograd, and the underground conspiracy and subterfuge that went into making it happen.

HIGH NOON: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic by Glenn Frankel
Out: Feb. 21
Frankel relates the making of the 1952 American western film High Noon, and how screenwriter Carl Foreman’s concept of the film evolved from idea to first draft to final script, taking on allegorical weight as he was forced to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his former membership in the Communist Party.

ISABELLA OF CASTILE: Europe’s First Great Queen by Giles Tremlett
Out: Mar. 7
Chronicles the life of Isabella of Castile, whose marriage to Ferdinand of Aragon in 1479 united two kingdoms, setting the stage for Spain’s golden era of global dominance.

THE LOCOMOTIVE OF WAR: Money, Empire, Power, and Guilt by Peter Clarke
Out: July 18
This book studies the power of war through the trajectories of David Lloyd George, Winston Churchill, John Maynard Keynes, Woodrow Wilson, and F.D.R., while examining the interplay between key figures in the context of unprecedented all-out wars (both in 1914 and 1939) and the broader dynamics of history during an extraordinary period.

AUTUMN OF THE BLACK SNAKE by William Hogeland
Out: May 16
Hogeland conjures up the woodland battles and hardball politics that formed the Legion of the United States, the country’s first true standing army, when in 1783 the newly independent United States found itself losing an escalating military conflict on its borderlands.

APOLLO 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon by Jeffrey Kluger
Out: May 16
Kluger tells of the 1968 race—over the course of just 16 weeks—to prepare an untested rocket to launch humankind’s first flight to the moon.

DODGE CITY: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West by Tom Clavin
Out: Feb. 28
Relates the story of two young and largely self-trained lawmen who led the effort that established frontier justice and the rule of law in the American West, specifically the depraved and criminal town of Dodge City, Kans.

MURDER IN THE CITY: New York, 1910–1920 by Wilfried Kaute
Out: June 13
A time capsule of crime and murder in New York in the decade of the 1910s, documented through more than 150 photographs, medical and police reports, testimonies, and analysis from the era.

Lifestyle (full list)

A COLORFUL WAY OF LIVING: How to Be More, Create More, Do More the Vera Bradley Way by Barbara Bradley Baekgaard (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Apr. 4
The founder of Vera Bradley shares the values to which she attributes her company’s runaway success.

THE HUNGRY BRAIN: Outsmarting the Instincts That Make Us Overeat by Stephan Guyenet (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
Neuroscience researcher Guyenet ties together mind and body in a health guide aimed at changing habits of thought, as well as habits of fitness and diet.

REAL LOVE: The Art of Authentic Connection by Sharon Salzberg
Out: June 6
A creative toolkit of mindfulness exercises, meditation techniques, and interactive applications that will guide readers through the process of stripping away layers of habit to find a truer meaning of love.

WHAT THE DEAD HAVE TAUGHT ME ABOUT LIVING WELL by Rebecca Rosen
Out: Feb. 14
A spiritual medium opens up about her personal life and answers the question she is asked most often: how does your connection to the “other side” help you navigate your day-to-day world?

THE HIIT BIBLE: Supercharge Your Body and Brain by Steve Barrett
Out: July 18
With HIIT (high intensity interval training) attaining widespread acceptance as a method for improving cardiovascular performance, this book aims to consolidate and demystify the science while also highlighting some of HIIT’s lesser-known benefits.

Literary Fiction (full list)

UNIVERSAL HARVESTER by John Darnielle (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
When mysterious footage begins appearing on VHS cassettes at the local Video Hut, life in the small town of Nevada, Iowa, takes a dark turn.

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
Out: June 6
A fractured family from the Chicago suburbs gathers in London for the eldest daughter’s marriage to an upper-crust Englishman, proving that the harder we strain against the ties that bind, the tighter they hold us close.

THE ANSWERS by Catherine Lacey
Out: June 6
Mary scours Craigslist for fast-cash jobs and finds herself applying for the “Girlfriend Experiment,” the brainchild of an eccentric and narcissistic actor, Kurt Sky, who is determined to find the perfect relationship—even if that means paying different women to fulfill distinctive roles.

LOVER by Anna Raverat
Out: Mar. 7
Kate, a senior executive at a multinational hotel company, has devoted her life to her job and her family. Catering to the needs of others comes easily to her, but now, after 10 years of marriage and two children, Kate discovers e-mails from her husband to another woman.

ENCIRCLING by Carl Frode Tiller, trans. by Barbara J. Haveland
Out: Feb. 21
David has lost his memory. When a newspaper ad asks his friends and family to share their memories of him, three respond: Jon, his closest friend; Silje, his teenage girlfriend; and Arvid, his estranged stepfather. This first book of a trilogy is a psychological portrait of a man by his friends.

SO MUCH BLUE by Percival Everett
Out: June 13
Kevin Pace, working on a painting that he won’t allow anyone to see, had an affair 10 years earlier with a young watercolorist in Paris. As the events of the past intersect with the present, Kevin struggles to justify the sacrifices he’s made for his art and the secrets he’s kept from his wife.

MARLENA by Julie Buntin
Out: Apr. 4
Fifteen-year-old Cat’s new town in rural Michigan is lonely and off-kilter, until she meets her neighbor, the manic, beautiful, pill-popping Marlena. The story of two girls and the feral year that will cost one her life and define the other’s for decades.

THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR by Yewande Omotoso
Out: Feb. 7
Hortensia James and Marion Agostino are neighbors. One is black, the other white. Both have recently been widowed, and are living with questions, disappointments, and secrets that have brought them shame. And each has something that the woman next door deeply desires.

THE STANDARD GRAND by Jay Baron Nicorvo
Out: Apr. 25
When an Army trucker goes AWOL before her third deployment, she meets a Vietnam vet and widower who inherited a tumbledown borscht belt resort. Converted into a halfway house for homeless veterans, the Standard—and its 2,000 acres over the Marcellus shale formation—is coveted by a Houston-based multinational company. Three violent acts are at the center of this debut.

Memoirs & Biographies (full list)

SCHADENFREUDE, A LOVE STORY: Me, the Germans, and 20 Years of Attempted Transformations, Unfortunate Miscommunications, and Humiliating Situations That Only They Have Words For by Rebecca Schuman (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
A young Jewish intellectual falls in love with a boy, a language, and a landscape as well as Kafka, and tries to figure them all out.

THIS CLOSE TO HAPPY: A Reckoning with Depression by Daphne Merkin (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
A personal account of a life afflicted with depression, from an affluent but neglected childhood to the present day.

THIS IS NOT A BORDER: Reportage and Reflection from the Palestine Festival of Literature by Ahdaf Soueif (a Top 10 pick)
Out: May 9
A collection of essays, poems, and sketches celebrating, in the words of Edward Said, “the power of culture over the culture of power.”

RECKLESS DAUGHTER: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell by David Yaffe
Out: June 13
A biography, with dozens of in-person interviews with Mitchell, reveals the backstory behind the famous songs—from her youth on the Canadian prairie, the child she gave up for adoption, through her albums and love affairs, to the present.

I WAS TOLD TO COME ALONE: My Journey Behind the Lines of Jihad by Souad Mekhennet
Out: June 13
The daughter of a Turkish mother and a Moroccan father, born and educated in Germany, Mekhennet reports from the Middle East to North Africa to explain the rise of Islamic radicalism.

FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL: A True Love Story by Peter Turner
Out: May 2
This memoir recounts a story of friendship, love and stardom that began when Turner’s former lover, Hollywood actress Gloria Grahame, collapsed in a Lancaster hotel, and he took her into his eccentric family’s home in Liverpool. Soon to be a major feature film starring Annette Bening, Jamie Bell, Julie Walters, and Vanessa Redgrave.

JACK AND NORMAN: A State-Raised Convict and the Legacy of Norman Mailer’s “The Executioner’s Song” by Jerome Loving
Out: Feb. 21
The tragic behind-the-scenes story of Norman Mailer’s Pulitzer Prize–winning classic, THE EXECUTIONER’S SONG, and his relationship with Jack Henry Abbott, who the author helped get out of prison and publish his book, IN THE BELLY OF THE BEAST, after which Abbott murdered a waiter and fled to Mexico before being recaptured and imprisoned.

Mysteries & Thrillers (full list)

DOWN A DARK ROAD by Linda Castillo (a Top 10 pick)
Out: July 11
Crime and religion collide in Castillo’s ninth Kate Burkholder mystery. The police chief of Painters Mill, Ohio, must track down an Amish man convicted of murdering his wife who has escaped from prison and taken his five children hostage.

ECHOES IN DEATH by J.D. Robb (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
The 44th novel featuring Lt. Eve Dallas from Robb (the pseudonym of Nora Roberts), a tale of murder and high society in a future Manhattan, shows why she dominates bestseller lists.

WOLF ON A STRING by Benjamin Black (a Top 10 pick)
Out: June 6
Black, the pen name of the Man Booker Prize–winning novelist John Banville, is the author of the Quirke mystery series set in 1950s Ireland and a Philip Marlowe pastiche, THE BLACK-EYED BLONDE. Now he turns his eye on 16th-century Prague in a tale of murder and magic.

BASED ON A TRUE STORY by Delphine de Vigan, trans. by George Miller
Out: May 9
In this metafictional psychological thriller, Delphine, a successful novelist, meets L.L., an intuitive woman who promises to cure her writer’s block. As their lives become more and more entwined, L. threatens Delphine’s identity, both as a writer and as an individual.

SIX FOUR by Hideo Yokoyama, trans. by Jonathan Lloyd-Davies
Out: Feb. 7
For five days in January 1989, the parents of a seven-year-old Tokyo schoolgirl listened to the demands of their daughter’s kidnapper. They would never see their daughter again. Fourteen years later, a press officer notices an anomaly in the case.

TOWER DOWN: A Kirk McGarvey Novel by David Hagberg
Out: May 16
A freelance killer, code-named Al-Nassar, blows the supports on a pencil tower in Manhattan and sends it crashing down. CIA legend McGarvey believes that someone in the Saudi Arabian government is behind the attack.

Poetry (full list)

AFTERLAND by Mai Der Vang (a Top 10 pick)
Out Apr. 4
The 2016 Walt Whitman Award–winner devastatingly describes the Hmong exodus from Laos; the fate of thousands of refugees, including her family; and Hmong resilience in exile.

I AM FLYING INTO MYSELF: Selected Poems, 1960–2014 by Bill Knott, edited by Thomas Lux (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 14
Arranged by his friend, poet Thomas Lux, Knott’s work—encompassing surrealistic wordplay, the antipoem, sonnets, sestinas, and haikus—all convenes in this inventive and brilliant book. readmoreremove

Happy Birthday D&Q!

The D&Q is not for Dairy Queen, but for our beloved graphic novel imprint, Drawn & Quarterly, which turns 25 this year!

To celebrate, they’ve put out an ah-mazing anthology: DRAWN & QUARTERLY: Twenty-five Years of Contemporary Cartooning, Comics, and Graphic Novels, which digs into the archives and features comics, biographies, personal reminiscences, and photographs, as well as new works by Michael DeForge, Guy Delisle, Miriam Katin, R. Sikoryak, and Jillian Tamaki and essays by Margaret Atwood, Jonathan Lethem, Sheila Heti, and Deb Olin Unferth.

Last weekend The New York Times ran a profile on D&Q, mentioning the anthology and how the imprint has become a champion for female cartoonists:

“So it seems somehow fitting, in a theater season in which the musical adaptation of the alternative cartoonist Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel ‘Fun Home’ won five major Tonys, that Drawn & Quarterly is celebrating its 25th anniversary by putting out a strikingly designed 776-page book that makes clear that its rise from Montreal ’zine to well-regarded publisher of graphic novels is inextricably intertwined with the advance of women in independent comics.” readmoreremove

Monday Fun Day! (10/8/2012 Edition)

It's Monday, people! Wake up and read the following...

- Read/admire Gene's comic review of JERUSALEM: Chronicles from the Holy City by Guy Delisle on Unshelved.com.

- Read The New Yorker's profile on Hilary Mantel, "The Dead are Real."

- Read the following quote from Susan Sontag that Picador recently featured on their tumblr

Harriet said something very striking yesterday, apropos of Sam W.’s enormous library, that collecting books in that way was “like marrying someone in order to sleep with him.”

True…

Use libraries!!

- Also, PUPPY IN A BOWL!

puppy in bowl

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Monday Fun Day! (5/14/2011 Edition)

Hello all you sassy librarians! I hope you had a lovely weekend and a brunch-tastic Mother's Day!

We have a couple of fun things to share:

Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City by Guy Delisle, which won the Best Comic Book Award this year at Angoulème, was recently featured in School Library Journal's Adult Books 4 Teens column! They said,

"This is a rounded, insightful way to explore and become acquainted with how history, culture, ritual, and human emotions shape and misshape a storied part of the world most Americans know only through politically charged news accounts. [...] Delicate and detailed cartoons inhabit mostly small and always bounded panels, with color accents highlighting sounds, sunsets, and points on the maps Delisle mentions to clarify how locations are connected–and disconnected–in the contemporary Middle East."

- BRING UP THE BODIES, sequel to Hilary Mantel's 2009 Man Booker Prize winner WOLF HALL, came out last week and according to McNally Jackson Books in NYC, it's quite popular...

- Did you see the big Chelsea Cain news?!

- Class act Lisa Scottoline talks about her writing process in The New York Times Business Day (link).

- Interested in the book jacket art process? Check out Minotaur Books' new tumblr, http://minotaurart.tumblr.com/.

- And finally, this tweet:

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First Look: 2012 Titles from Drawn & Quarterly

D&Q Collage 2012

Graphic novel readers, rejoice! Drawn & Quarterly has some exciting new comics coming out this year. Here's a quick look at the schedule:

February:

Berlin #18
Jason Lutes

Jinchalo
Matt Forsythe 

Goliath
Tom Gauld 

April:

Gloriana
Kevin Huizenga 

Idyll 
Amber Albrecht 

Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City 
Guy Delisle 

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