Articles tagged "friendships"

Happy #BookBday (6/6/17 Edition)

Oh what a lovely day for a #BookBday, especially when they’re great summer reads!

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
One of Entertainment Weekly‘s Summer’s Must-Read Books and PW‘s Best Books of Summer 2017 with two starred reviews! A bitingly funny, hugely entertaining novel in which a fractured family from the Chicago suburbs must gather in London for their eldest daughter’s marriage to an upper-crust Englishman. “Ginder takes family dysfunction to its hysterical limit in this joyously ribald, sharply cynical, and impossible-to-put-down examination of love and loyalty.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE ANSWERS by Catherine Lacey
One of Buzzfeed’s “Exciting New Books You Need To Read This Summer” with two starred reviews!Startling and stunning and compulsively strange, Lacey’s sophomore novel is a haunting investigation into the nature of love. With otherworldly precision and subtle wit, Lacey creates a gently surreal dreamscape that’s both intoxicating and profound. A singular novel; as unexpected as it is rich.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

GRIEF COTTAGE by Gail Godwin
One of Buzzfeed’s “Thrillers You Will Devour This Summer” with two starred reviews! The haunting tale of a desolate cottage, a tragic accident, and the hair-thin junction between this life and the next, from bestselling National Book Award finalist Godwin. “With intriguingly eccentric supporting characters and a dramatic setting, Godwin’s riveting and wise story of the slow coalescence of trust and love between a stoic artist and a grieving boy, and of nature’s glory and indifference, subtly and insightfully explores different forms of haunting and vulnerability, strength and survival. Word will spread quickly about Godwin’s tender and spellbinding supernatural novel.” — Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

PW’s Writers to Watch Spring 2017: Anticipated Debuts

Publishers Weekly recently shared their most anticipated debuts of Spring 2017, including two of our favorites:

MARLENA by Julie Buntin
Teenage friendships almost never make sense, which might explain why so many of them fall apart as people get older, and also why fiction writers often turn to them for material. When Julie Buntin was working on MARLENA, her debut novel about the aftermath of an intense friendship between two teenage girls, she was faced with the challenge of making that particular obsession legible to readers. “It’s hard to capture why a character finds someone else magnetic,” Buntin, 29, says. “How can you translate that into something the reader can connect to?”

Marlena centers on two characters, 15-year-old Cat and 17-year-old Marlena, who become pals when Cat moves to the town in northern Michigan where Marlena lives. Buntin, in the words of PW’s starred review, “is particularly sensitive to the misery of adolescent angst,” observing how Cat becomes increasingly enamored of the unstable Marlena, who is “musically talented, beautiful, and doomed to die young.”


THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR by Yewande Omotoso
Rare is the novel that features older women as protagonists, rather than as mere supporting characters or props. Rarer still is the novel willing to depict aging women in all their complications, regrets, and swarming hostilities. But that’s precisely what Yewande Omotoso, a Barbados-born South African writer, set out to do her in novel, THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR, her second work of fiction and her first to be published in the U.S. readmoreremove

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