Articles tagged "fiction"

PW Best Books of Summer 2017

PWSummer2017Publishers Weekly’s editors recently selected their Best Books of Summer 2017, including these seven Macmillan titles:
Staff Picks (full list)

BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
“About that thing on the cover—is it a genetically modified bird-of-paradise? Some cousin of the odoriferous corpse flower? I was intrigued from the moment I saw it, as is Rachel, the postapocalyptic scavenger who finds the improbably sentient and mutable creature—who ‘smelled of beach reeds on lazy summer afternoons and, beneath the sea salt, of passionflowers’—while picking through the fur of the gargantuan flying bear that terrorizes her devastated city. And then things start to get weird.” — Carolyn Juris, features editor

ISADORA by Amelia Gray
“Gray’s most recent book, the story collection GUTSHOT, was weird as hell and as visceral as its title. Whose life would be better for her to fictionalize, then, than that of notorious mother of modern dance Isadora Duncan? An openly bisexual communist and atheist in an era that condemned all three, Duncan was famous for wearing long, flowing scarves even up until her death, when her scarf got caught in one of the axles of the car she was riding in. Flung from the vehicle, Duncan died of a broken neck—a tragic end that will surely make for a riveting finale in Gray’s novel.” — John Maher, assistant news editor

Fiction (full list)

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
Ginder takes family dysfunction to its hysterical limit in this joyously ribald novel about siblings Alice and Paul begrudgingly attending the lavish wedding of their half-sister, Eloise, in England. Lovesick Alice and Paul—both in doomed relationships—see Eloise as the snotty daughter of a rich dad, and Donna, their mother, as a coldhearted widow who ditched all remnants of their father after his death. During the boozy pre-wedding days, the resentment and secrets come tumbling out in outbursts and hilariously bad decisions. readmoreremove

2017 Pulitzer Finalists

Congratulations to our 2017 Pulitzer Prize finalists, THE SPORT OF KINGS by C. E. Morgan (Fiction) & IN THE DARKROOM by Susan Faludi (Biography or Autobiography)!

The Pulitzer Prizes have been honoring excellence in journalism and the arts since 1917. See the full list of winners and nominees here.

Happy #BookBday (4/4/17 Edition)

Happy #BookBday to five new works of fiction waiting to be snapped up by your patrons:

MARLENA by Julie Buntin
An April 2017 Indie Next pick, a Barnes & Noble Spring 2017 Discover pick and one of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Spring 2017 Debuts with FOUR starred reviews! An electric debut novel about love, addiction, and loss; the story of two girls and the feral year that will cost one her life, and define the other’s for decades. “Buntin’s prose is emotional and immediate, and the interior lives she draws of young women and obsessive best friends are Ferrante-esque.” — Booklist, starred review

A LITTLE MORE HUMAN by Fiona Maazel
An April 2017 Indie Next pick! Meet Phil Snyder: new father, nursing assistant at a cutting-edge biotech facility on Staten Island, and all-around decent guy. Phil also has a special talent he doesn’t want to publicize—he’s a mind reader and moonlights as Brainstorm, a costumed superhero. But when Phil wakes up from a blackout drunk and is confronted with photos that seem to show him assaulting an unknown woman, even superpowers won’t help him. “Maazel takes a dark, inventive look at the cost of pushing humans to their limits.” — Booklist

THE SISTERS OF BLUE MOUNTAIN by Karen Katchur
Perfect for fans of Lisa Scottoline and Heather Gudenkauf, a suspenseful novel in which a small-town murder forces two sisters to face the secrets and lies that have torn them apart. “Katchur weaves a suspenseful tale of family secrets and what it means to keep quiet. For readers who relish complex family mysteries.” — Library Journal

CASTLE OF WATER by Dane Huckelbridge
Castaway meets The Notebook in this beautifully written adventure/romance set on a deserted island from first-time novelist Dane Huckelbridge. “…a diverting if sentimental story with just enough detours from the obvious path to keep it from predictability.” — Booklist
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2016 Triangle Awards Finalists

The 2016 Publishing Triangle Awards finalists, honoring the best LGBTQ fiction, nonfiction and poetry, as well as the year’s best trans and gender-variant literature, include these six Macmillan books:

Randy Shilts Award for Gay Nonfiction
THE NARROW DOOR by Paul Lisicky (Graywolf Press)

Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry
BESTIARY by Donika Kelly (Graywolf Press)

Thom Gunn Award for Gay Poetry
RAPTURE by Sjohnna McCray (Graywolf Press)

Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction
HIDE by Matthew Griffin (Bloomsbury USA)

Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction
MOONSTONE by Sjón; translated by Victoria Cribb (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
THEY MAY NOT MEAN TO, BUT THEY DO by Cathleen Schine (Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

UPDATE 4/28/17: Congratulations to THEY MAY NOT MEAN TO, BUT THEY DO by Cathleen Schine (Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar, Straus and Giroux) for winning the Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction!

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2017 LA Times Book Prize Nominees

The Los Angeles Times announced their 2017 Book Prize finalists and we’ve got 11 nominees:

Fiction
WHAT BELONGS TO YOU by Garth Greenwell

Mystery/Thriller
THE NORTH WATER by Ian McGuire

Current Interest
CITY OF THORNS by Ben Rawlence
A RAGE FOR ORDER: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to ISIS by Robert F. Worth

Biography
MAD ENCHANTMENT: Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies by Ross King
GUILTY THING: A Life of Thomas De Quincey by Frances Wilson

Science & Technology
PANDEMIC: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond by Sonia Shah
LIGHT: A Radiant History from Creation to the Quantum Age by Bruce Watson

Poetry
HOUSE OF LORDS AND COMMONS by Ishion Hutchinson

Graphic Novel/Comics
BEVERLY by Nick Drnaso
DEMON: Volume 1 by Jason Shiga

Winners will be announced at a ceremony during the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on April 21. For more information and the full list of nominees click here.

PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017

These ten Macmillan titles are some of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017:

Fiction
BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
In a future strewn with the cast-off experiments of an industrial laboratory known only as the Company, a scavenger named Rachel survives alongside her lover, Wick, a dealer of memory-altering beetles with whom she takes shelter from the periodic ravages of a giant mutant bear named Mord. One day, caught in Mord’s fur, Rachel finds the bizarre, shape-shifting creature “like a hybrid of sea anemone and squid” she calls Borne.

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror
AMBERLOUGH by Lara Elena Donnelly
Donnelly’s debut, a fast-moving tale of desperate love and intrigue in a created world that recalls Europe on the brink of WWII, is emotionally wrenching and shockingly timely.

Poetry
AFTERLAND by Mai Der Vang
Vang, the 2016 Walt Whitman Award winner, tells the story of Hmong diaspora forced out of Laos and into exile as a result of the U.S.’s secret war. Vang’s unflinching poems address the status of refugees, including her family, and Hmong resilience in exile.

Comics/Graphic Novels
BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki
Tamaki’s last two books—THIS ONE SUMMER and SUPER MUTANT MAGIC ACADEMY—showed she is one of the world’s best cartoonists, and this collection of her evocative short stories will just cement her reputation.

Memoir
THIS CLOSE TO HAPPY: A Reckoning with Depression by Daphne Merkin
A personal account of a life afflicted with depression, from an affluent but neglected childhood to the present day.

Literary Essays/Criticism/Biographies
THE NOVEL OF THE CENTURY: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables by David Bellos
Bellos, a translator of French literature, proves that the story of how Victor Hugo’s classic novel came to life is a complex and engrossing epic all its own.

Politics/Current Events
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.
Former public defender Forman offers a complex look at the part played by African-Americans in shaping criminal justice policy.

Music
RECKLESS DAUGHTER: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell by David Yaffe
A biography, with dozens of in-person interviews with Mitchell, reveals the backstory behind the famous songs—from her youth on the Canadian prairie, the child she gave up for adoption, through her albums and love affairs, to the present. readmoreremove

Celebrate Black History Month

February is Black History Month! To celebrate, we’re having an e-Book sale all month long, and we’ve put together an Edelweiss collection of nearly 200 titles (History! Biography! Fiction! Culture!) to help you with collection development. Here are some highlights:

Nonfiction
TEARS WE CANNOT STOP: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson
A CONSEQUENTIAL PRESIDENT: The Legacy of Barack Obama by Michael D’Antonio
THE MEANING OF MICHELLE: 16 Writers on the Iconic First Lady and How Her Journey Inspires Our Own by Veronica Chambers
MY LIFE, MY LOVE, MY LEGACY by Coretta Scott King & Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman, Jr.

Fiction / Graphic Novels
AND THEN THERE WAS ME by Sadeqa Johnson
BOSS by Tracy Brown
THE STREETS HAVE NO KING by JaQuavis Coleman
THE SUPREMES SING THE HAPPY HEARTACHE BLUES by Edward Kelsey Moore
FIRE!! THE ZORA NEALE HURSTON STORY by Peter Bagge
THREE-FIFTHS A MAN: A Graphic History of the African American Experience by Sid Jacobson & Ernie Colón

Click here to view the Black History Month Edelweiss collection.

Fiction All-Stars

We’re seeing lots of stars for these upcoming fiction releases:

THE DARK FLOOD RISES by Margaret Drabble – 3 stars!
“For women of a certain age, it is a pure pleasure to grow older alongside Drabble. For all others, there’s plenty of joy to be had in this thoughtful meditation on aging and mortality.” — Library Journal, starred review

“Searingly sad but often hilarious… Drabble has filled her tale with characters desperately trying to make sense of life and loss, of beauty, talent, missed opportunities, faded passion.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Those who appreciate her able combination of intelligence, wit, and rue will willingly follow Drabble into the sunset.” Kirkus Reviews, starred review

CONVICTION by Julia Dahl – 3 stars!
“CONVICTION is a cleverly named compelling chronicle…[about] the very meaning of power and poverty, justice, family, and, best of all, hope. Timely and perfect for twenty- and thirtysomething fans of Megan Abbott and Lisa Lutz.” — Booklist, starred review

“Outstanding… Dahl excels at revealing the inner workings of enigmatic subcultures while maintaining peak suspense. She also provides a terrific ‘whoa, I didn’t see that coming” moment.’” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Newcomers to this award-winning series can jump right in with this installment, and be eager to read about Rebekah’s earlier investigations (INVISIBLE CITY; RUN YOU DOWN). The unsettling coercion of a confession from a teenage suspect could make this a good suggestion for fans of the show Making a Murderer. A surefire winner for any mystery or suspense fan. ” — Library Journal, starred review

WALKAWAY by Cory Doctorow
“Doctorow offers a counterintuitive alternate (possible?) future in this gritty yet hopeful sci-fi epic. A truly visionary techno-thriller that not only depicts how we might live tomorrow, but asks why we don’t already.” Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The sweeping epic, which covers decades of Walkaway life—despite some difficult-to-read but entirely believable character trauma—is ultimately suffused with hope.” — Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

Chicago Public Library’s 2016 “Best of the Best Books”

cplbestof2016We’ve got 14 books on Chicago Public Library’s “Best of the Best Books 2016” list! Selected by a team of CPL librarians, the list represents the year’s most outstanding titles, books of exceptional quality for a diverse, city-wide readership.

Fiction
CHILDREN OF THE NEW WORLD by Alexander Weinstein
GRIEF IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS by Max Porter
THE LAST PAINTING OF SARA DE VOS by Dominic Smith
THE NORTH WATER by Ian McGuire
THE SECRETS OF WISHTIDE by Kate Saunders

Nonfiction
IN THE COUNTRY WE LOVE: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero
IN THE DARKROOM by Susan Faludi
THE SOUTH SIDE: A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation by Natalie Y. Moore

Teen Fiction
AMERICAN GIRLS by Alison Umminger
IF I WAS YOUR GIRL by Meredith Russo
THE STAR-TOUCHED QUEEN by Roshani Chokshi
WHEN THE MOON WAS OURS by Anna-Marie McLemore readmoreremove

Buzzfeed’s 24 Best Fiction Books Of 2016

Buzzfeed’s 24 Best Fiction Books Of 2016 list includes three Macmillan gems!

WHAT BELONGS TO YOU by Garth Greenwell
In WHAT BELONGS TO YOU, an American teacher in Bulgaria encounters a captivating hustler named Mitko in a public bathroom, setting into motion an ambiguously transactional relationship marked by both tenderness and brutality, connection and isolation. WHAT BELONGS TO YOU speaks of desire and the lives of those who desire with exquisite specificity and power, and will haunt you long after you turn the final page.

SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS by Helen Phillips
SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS, a collection of short stories, presents us with a surreal, disturbing assemblage of worlds, each complete and somehow totally convincing despite their strangeness. Though the characters of SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS struggle to connect with one another, all the while dealing with problems such as knowing the exact date of their deaths, or what happens when friends disapprove of their high-tech sex robot, SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS is a delight — there is joy in its darkness, and pleasure in its exuberant imagination. readmoreremove

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