Articles tagged "Feminism"

Most Anticipated Books of 2018

Best of 2017 has come and gone, now here are the most anticipated books of 2018, according to major media:
Entertainment Weekly50 books we can’t wait to read in 2018

THE HAZEL WOOD by Melissa Albert
One of the most anticipated debuts of the year — having set off an auction frenzy — THE HAZEL WOOD is a contemporary fantasy of an aggressively literary bent, centered on a 17-year-old whose mother is stolen away.

LOOK ALIVE OUT THERE by Sloane Crosley
Crosley may have put essays aside for her 2015 novel THE CLASP, but she returns with her particular brand of sardonic wit in this new collection. The tone, she told EW, is “somewhere between jaded misanthrope and easily amused child.”

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies and Leadership by James Comey
What will James Comey reveal in this anticipated memoir? Publisher Flatiron Books isn’t giving much away, just saying that the former FBI director promises to give a vital lesson on sound leadership, drawing on his own experiences to provide a manual that certain world leaders desperately need.

USA Today10 big books to kick off 2018

THE WIFE BETWEEN US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
What it’s about: In this twisty psychological thriller, a woman dumped by her rich husband is determined to prevent his remarriage to her “replacement.”
Why it’s hot: Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Partners, which brought THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN to the big screen, has picked up film rights for THE WIFE BETWEEN US.

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies and Leadership by James Comey
What it’s about:
The former FBI director, famously fired by President Trump in May, writes a book about leadership based on his own experiences and observations in government.
Why it’s hot: According to the publisher, Comey’s book will examine what “good, ethical leadership looks like and how it drives sound decisions.” The burning question: What will he say about Trump?

The Washington PostLeadership Books to Read in 2018

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies and Leadership by James Comey
The former FBI director — fired by President Trump and now, some say, a Zen-like master of throwing subtle shade on Twitter and Instagram — inked what was reported to be a multi-million dollar book deal in August. The book’s publisher has said the book by Comey, also a former Justice Department official and lawyer, promises to give readers “unprecedented entry into the corridors of power, and a remarkable lesson in leadership itself.” Comey, who frequently uses social media to share quotations about character, justice, leadership and power, tweeted an image of the Statue of Liberty on Dec. 5, saying he was in New York to meet with his publisher, with the note: “Hope leadership book will be useful. Reassuring to see Lady Liberty standing tall even in rough weather.”

InStyleBooks We Can’t Wait to Read in 2018

THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
A Vietnam POW returns from overseas and opts to relocate his family to a remote area of Alaska, far removed from the threats of war-torn societies, for a fresh start. All seems well until his PTSD kicks in during the harsh winter and turns their tiny cabin dream into a living nightmare.

LOOK ALIVE OUT THERE by Sloane Crosley
If accolades from Steve Martin and David Sedaris are any indication, Sloane Crosley’s new collection of essays delivers, with hilarious takes on fertility, mingling with swingers, and her blink-and-you’ll-miss-it cameo on Gossip Girl.

EsquireThe 27 Most Anticipated Books of 2018

OLIVER LOVING by Stefan Merrill Block
Oliver Loving has been paralyzed and locked in his own mind for nearly a decade, the result of a shooting in his small Texas town. In Stefan Merrill Block’s psychologically astute novel, the damaged people that surround Oliver try to piece together their own versions of what happened that night and since then, even as doctors prepare a new treatment that might help Oliver communicate again.

THE HAZEL WOOD by Melissa Albert
Here is one of those rare young adult fantasy novels that holds a self-contained world in only a few hundred pages. So much world-building, so little space. If the novel’s heroine is a teenage girl, then her story will appeal to readers of all ages, with its intrigue and strange fairy tale magic and very grown up writing.

WHAT ARE WE DOING HERE? by Marilynne Robinson
Even in her fiction, Marilynne Robinson has a nonjudgmental, earnest way of writing about religion that could make an atheist long for spirituality. President Obama is a fan. In this essay collection theology and current events and philosophy take center stage, and it’s through the clarity of Robinson’s words that hope in times of political strife feels appropriate and urgent.

SOME HELL by Patrick Nathan
A heartbreaker of a book, Patrick Nathan’s debut novel captures the hell of adolescence under particularly dire circumstances: Colin is reeling from his father’s suicide even as he navigates coming of age as a gay teenager. As they are wont to do, sex and death dominate Colin’s thoughts as he makes his way, in agony but with an eye towards a hopeful future.

THE MERRY SPINSTER: Tales of Everyday Horror by Mallory Ortberg
Look out, Angela Carter. There’s a new feminist fairy tale queen in town, and her imagination is as sharp as her wit. Ortberg, co-founder of the beloved website The Toast, takes her column “Children’s Stories Made Horrific” to new heights in this collection of twisted tales that will shock and delight you.

Elle19 of the Best Books to Read This Winter

THREE DAUGHTERS OF EVE by Elif Shafak
From the most widely read female writer in Turkey, here’s a novel that sees violence and nostalgia vie for one woman’s attention on one intense night. In Istanbul, a relatively minor crime—an attempted robbery—sparks a wave of memories as the wealthy Peri ponders an old photograph of her college friends. As terrorist attacks break out, the religious and cultural differences between the three women demand her attention in the fraught present.

WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST: A Black Lives Matter Memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Asha Bandele
Patrisse Khan-Cullors co-founded one of the most vital activist groups of recent years. Now, get to the heart of Black Lives Matter with her account of how the movement began, and marvel at the brilliance and persistence of her mission despite a continuing lack of understanding and compassion from many.

PEACH by Emma Glass
In the wake of a horrific sexual assault, titular protagonist Peach attempts to navigate a life that has tilted on its axis. As accounts of sexual assault and misconduct have arisen in recent months, our inability to reckon with such events and their aftermath has only become more clear. This short novel—under 100 pages—confronts the enormity with impressionistic grace.

FORCE OF NATURE by Jane Harper
Wow, this crime novel just gave me my newest nightmare: Five colleagues go on a hike (first mistake), and one doesn’t return. Four different stories makes it hard for Agent Aaron Falk (whom we met in Harper’s debut, THE DRY) to discern the truth. Don’t read this one during the workweek.

WHAT ARE WE DOING HERE? by Marilynne Robinson
Equipped with a heart and mind that seem more capacious than ours (though she might have a match in fan Barack Obama), Marilynne Robinson has made a career out of writing life-expanding novels and wonderings, like Pulitzer Prize–winning novel GILEAD. Soon, she’ll give us a new set of essays about faith, life, and culture. readmoreremove

Our #LibFaves17 Picks

We enjoyed seeing so many of you participate in #LibFaves17 (thanks for making Jane Harper’s THE DRY an official 2017 Top Ten pick!).

Now here are OUR #LibFaves17 picks (aka our 2017 “Recommended Reads” from the newsletter):

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THE MAP THAT LEADS TO YOU by J.P. Monninger
Also available in audio
Finally, a book version of that romantic trilogy of films that Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy collaborated on… And most especially reminiscent of BEFORE SUNRISE. I’m also fondly reminded of the first boy that I ever fell in love with, his name was Lenny Grant, we were both sixteen and attending a summer writing program in Boston. It may as well have been Europe…

THE STANDARD GRAND by Jay Baron Nicorvo
THE STANDARD GRAND is reminiscent of Frank Bill’s CRIMES IN SOUTHERN INDIANA in terms of its grittiness and the ragtag group of misfit anti-heroes trying to survive in the wilderness. And I’ve always loved reading novels that were written in a sort of rushed exuberance—as if the author just had to share his or her story…

KNIFE CREEK by Paul Doiron
Also available in audio
Paul Doiron’s Mike Bowditch (my favorite bad-ass—does everything on his own terms—Maine game warden) is back for more! In KNIFE CREEK, Mike and his girlfriend Stacy (a bit of a rogue operator herself) are hunting wild rampaging boars that are destroying their beautiful town and surrounding environs. During the hunt, the couple discovers a dead infant in a shallow grave. Mike is a game warden but he’s got the instincts of a seasoned detective and must find out who committed such a gruesome deed. He just can’t help himself. And I love him for that. A home explosion that nearly kills him, an encounter with two very strange “sisters” wearing matching red wigs—one of whom may or may not be a long-dead co-ed (or was she kidnapped?), and a small town that’s full of suspects… Mike’s clearly on to something here, but what?

FRESH COMPLAINT by Jeffrey Eugenides
Also available in audio
I’ve always loved short story collections (see Shobha Rao’s AN UNRESTORED WOMAN, Tom Perrotta’s NINE INCHES, David Bezmozgis’ NATASHA, Helen Ellis’ AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE, Lauren Holmes’ BARBARA THE SLUT, James Franco’s PALO ALTO). The intensity of dipping into a life, briefly, and popping right out of it again… Of meeting someone at a particularly vulnerable and strangely fascinating moment in their lives… Of sharing that moment with them but never fully knowing when it began or where it ends is particularly exciting to me. And in Jeffrey Eugenides’ new short story collection FRESH COMPLAINT, meditations abound on life at every stage and at its most banally bizarre moments. Readers are thrown into a period of post-college idealism (and dysentery), mid-life pregnancies (and an ensuing tragicomedy), rebuilding after failure, sex studies in the jungle (and leaving one’s inhibitions behind), the worshiping of a musical instrument, a green card marriage and finally death. And we are treated to it all with a healthy dose of slightly off-beat characters.

THE WIFE BETWEEN US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
Also available in audio
There’s a marketing specialist at Macmillan whose taste in books I trust completely. I will not name names, because she is my secret “book Santa” and I refuse to share her. Since 2004, she has very occasionally sent me manuscripts to read. She has always chosen a book that I end up loving, hating deeply, or at the very least ends up inciting an incredibly visceral reaction. I won’t list the favorites she’s sent, because her identity will most certainly be revealed. And now let’s talk about her latest manuscript, THE WIFE BETWEEN US. There is no train. There is no girl. There is drinking (all good stories need alcohol, right?). There is an unreliable narrator (but those are the most intriguing, aren’t they?). There is a handsome husband (marriages are always fascinating to dissect, good or bad!). There is “another” woman (a thriller always needs a mysterious “other,” right?). And that’s all I can tell you. Read it. And let’s talk about that ending.

INDECENT by Corinne Sullivan
An insecure shy teacher’s apprentice barely out of college at an all boys boarding school is tempted by the popular boy… He’s brash, he’s arrogant, he’s the leader of the pack… But, will she do what’s right? I can’t help but think of the only younger man that I ever dated. During the summer before I went off to college I dated a rising senior. He wore Polo cologne, had long hair and we spent most of that summer in hidden corners and behind closed doors. But it’s not the same, is it? readmoreremove

Monday Funday With New Nonfiction

Memoirs, feminism, espionage, comedians, dogs—these new nonfiction books available this month have something for every reader:

ADMISSIONS: Life as a Brain Surgeon by Henry Marsh
“Like DO NO HARM, Marsh’s previous memoir, ADMISSIONS is ‘wandering and ruminative, an overland trek through the doctor’s anxieties and private shames,’ our critic Jennifer Senior writes. Marsh once again recounts his miscalculations and surgical catastrophes; rails against the constraints of an increasingly depersonalized British health care system; and describes his operating theater in all of its Grand Guignol splendor.”New York Times Book Review (10 New Books We Recommend This Week, 10/12/17)

WAITING FOR THE PUNCH: Words to Live by from the WTF Podcast by Marc Maron, foreword by John Oliver
From the beloved and wildly popular podcast WTF with Marc Maron comes a collection of intimate, hilarious and life changing conversations with some of the biggest names in entertainment. “From a book by a comedian, filled with the words of other comedians, readers will expect some laughs. What they might not expect are heartfelt revelations, life lessons, and perhaps even a cry or two.” — Booklist

DARE NOT LINGER: The Presidential Years by Nelson Mandela & Mandla Langa, prologue by Graça Machel
The long-awaited second volume of Nelson Mandela’s memoirs, left unfinished at his death and never before available, are here completed and expanded with notes and speeches written by Mandela during his historic presidency, making for a moving sequel to his worldwide bestseller LONG WALK TO FREEDOM. “The title comes from Mandela himself, who noted, ‘With freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

REAL AMERICAN: A Memoir by Julie Lythcott-Haims
A fearless debut memoir in which beloved and bestselling HOW TO RAISE AN ADULT author Julie Lythcott-Haims pulls no punches in her recollections of growing up a biracial black woman in America. “Using powerfully effective prose, the author explains the impacts of racism on her daily life in both small and large ways, its chipping away at her feelings of self-worth. A compelling and important addition to any collection of personal narratives by women of color.” — Library Journal, starred review

NASTY WOMEN: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump’s America, edited by Samhita Mukhopadhyay & Kate Harding
“Twenty-three influential and eloquent feminist writers of the twenty-first century have come together to create this searing and urgent collection. This book invites readers to converse, comfort, and hold one another accountable in the hope of igniting radical, intersectional change.” — Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

SLJ’s Best Adult Books 4 Teens 2016

School Library Journal recently revealed their Best Books of 2016, and SLJ’s Best Adult Books 4 Teens list includes three Macmillan titles:

THE BRICKS THAT BUILT THE HOUSES by Kate Tempest
Two pairs of twentysomethings in modern London—Harry, a drug dealer, and her best friend, “tough” Leon; Becky, an erotic masseuse and dancer, and her overprotective boyfriend, Pete—try to find their place in the gritty underbelly of London. Tempest builds on the stories first outlined in her hip-hop album Everybody Down to create a dark tale of coming-of-age in an unforgiving world.

EVERDAY SEXISM by Laura Bates
Using hundreds of tales from women (and men) about sexual abuse, catcalling, and sexism, Bates draws from her social media project, Everyday Sexism, to create a must-have title about social justice, feminism, and microaggressions.

THE MIDNIGHT ASSASSIN: Panic, Scandal, and the Hunt for America’s First Serial Killer by Skip Hollandsworth
In the mid-1880s, an ax murderer targeted the women of Austin, TX. Fans of history and true crime won’t be disappointed by this fascinating and intricately researched account of a serial killer who predated England’s Jack the Ripper. readmoreremove

Biography Roundup

Love biographies? Check out these three fascinating lives:

EVELYN WAUGH: A Life Revisited by Philip Eade
On the fiftieth anniversary of Evelyn Waugh’s death, here is a completely fresh view of one of the most gifted—and fascinating—writers of our time. “A biography both thoughtful and intimate… Drawing on previously unavailable letters, manuscripts, and diaries, Eade illuminates connections between Waugh’s much-lauded fiction and the author’s concealed emotional life. A convincing portrait of a flawed but gifted artist.” — Booklist, starred review

THE POPE OF PHYSICS: Enrico Fermi and the Birth of the Atomic Age by Gino Segrè & Bettina Hoerlin
Two starred reviews! “By placing stunning scientific advances into historical context, this engaging biography of Nobel Prize–winning Italian physicist Enrico Fermi (1901–1954) captures the life and times of one of the 20th century’s most creative and hard-working scientists. Segrè and Hoerlin draw an engaging portrait of a man with boundless curiosity who delighted in his work; fans of pop science and history will thoroughly enjoy this entertaining and accessible biography of a scientist who deserves to be better understood.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (5/31/16 Edition)

Happy #BookBday to three new books tinged with sci-fi & fantasy:

THE GEEK FEMINIST REVOLUTION by Kameron Hurley (also available in trade paperback)
A powerful collection of essays on feminism, geek culture, and a writer’s journey, from one of the most important new voices in genre. “Hurley is certainly not the first to point out the deep misogyny in 21st-century popular culture, but she articulates the problems in an incisive, opinionated, and demanding blend of analysis and personal storytelling that will inspire her readers and peers in the science fiction community to work toward change.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS by Helen Phillips
One of Buzzfeed’s 19 Incredible New Spring Books! “The short stories in this darkly absorbing collection remind us of the hope and humanity, the warmth, joy, and love that can be found in even the bleakest circumstances. Phillips proves yet again that she is an intuitive, emotionally resonant writer who is willing to consider some of life’s biggest questions and offer, yes, a few possible solutions.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (5/12/15 Edition)

Oh, what a lovely day for a #BookBday! Today we celebrate:

THE ANCHORESS by Robyn Cadwallader
A startling and strange debut novel set in 11th century England about a young girl’s desperate choice to isolate herself from the world. “Cadwallader’s vivid period descriptions set a stunning backdrop for this beautiful first novel as Sarah rejects a larger world that will not allow her to live on her own terms and goes about creating a smaller one that will. Sarah’s path will intrigue readers at the crossroads of historical fiction, spirituality, and even feminism as she faces the internal and external pressures on women of the Middle Ages.” — Booklist, starred review

THE SHELL SEEKERS by Rosamund Pilcher
Pilcher’s beloved, #1 New York Times bestselling family saga—a captivating story of life and love—is now available for the first time ever in trade paperback! “A huge warm saga… A deeply satisfying story written with love and confidence.”
— Maeve Binchy, New York Times Book Review

Wonder Women Wednesday!

When we think of "wonder women," we naturally think of librarians. (We know there are great men librarians, too, but today we're focusing on the ladies.) So when the book WONDER WOMEN: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection by Debora L. Spar came up on our radar we thought it was only fitting to share it with you.

Before writing WONDER WOMEN Spar, who is the president of Barnard College, believed gender equality had been achieved and that women could have it all "with babies, board seats, and husbands in tow." As she struggled to do just that, Spar started to wonder: How far have women really come? And what will it take to get true equality for good?

Much like Sheryl Sandberg's LEAN IN, WONDER WOMEN examines those questions with new research about how women's lives have—and have not—changed over the past fifty years, told through the lens of Spar’s personal story.

Glamour called the book "Explosive," and Booklist said, “As [Spar] shifts from the reasoned research of academics to the grocery checkout lines with their masses of impossible celebrity weight-loss triumphs while providing the facts and figures of gender politics from the workplace to the dreaded department-store changing room, Spar’s acerbic wit would do Dorothy Parker proud. WONDER WOMEN is equally valuable as a reference source for college-bound daughters and as a lively read for their mothers to dissect in book clubs.”

Spar has an incredible media line-up for WONDER WOMEN, including:

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