Articles tagged "Estep Nagy"

#fridayreads (07/07/17)

Today’s #fridayreads are all debuts!

South Pole Station by Ashley Shelby

A July Indie Next List Selection!

“Shelby’s first novel, based on a short story that won the Third Coast Fiction Prize, skillfully weaves science, climate change, politics, sociology, and art. Competing ideas about the origins of the universe are wrapped in the vagaries of human nature and the dangers of climate extremes. Her characters are a quirky subset of humanity. VERDICT All readers of fiction, particularly those interested in life in extreme climates, will find this appealing.”–Library Journal (starred review)

“Readers will find characters to love, suspect, and identify with among Cooper’s fellow Polies and won’t forget them easily. A good match for readers whose interest in Antarctica was sparked by Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette? (2014), those who enjoy stories about quirky individuals and made families, and extreme armchair travelers.”–Booklist

“This is a fascinating novel, loaded with interesting history of Antarctic exploration, current scientific operations, and the living and working conditions of those folks brave enough to endure six months of darkness and six months of daylight.”–Publishers Weekly

Tornado Weather by Deborah E. Kennedy

“Kennedy’s moving debut novel, about people living in small-town Indiana, reads like interconnected short stories as each chapter is told from a different character’s perspective…Kennedy has painted a distinctive picture of a Midwestern blue-collar town that will remind readers of Richard Russo’s work. Fans of Did You Ever Have a Family (2015), by Bill Clegg, will also find much to admire.”–Booklist

“Kennedy’s heartbreaking debut novel captures the warped and isolated landscape of today’s American Midwest… Though this story is hung on a child gone missing and a tornado on the horizon, the focus is the flawed folks who people it. The author is a fine mimic, inhabiting her characters in such a way that we know them from the inside out. The denouement, coming as it does from a surreal, bird’s-eye view, is very strange indeed. Kennedy’s superb chorus leaves an indelible impression.”–Publishers Weekly

We Shall Not Sleep by Estep Nagy

“An unusual and compelling debut…a surprising delight. Nagy mixes narrative modes and tones (and generations) nimbly; it’s rare to see suspense and literary lyricism woven together so well.”–Kirkus Reviews

“Nagy neatly juggles his many characters, allowing suspense to develop naturally and working in thought-provoking variations on the themes of betrayal and survival.”–Booklist

Sneak Peek: June 2017 Indie Next List

indie nextThe June 2017 Indie Next list includes four Macmillan titles!

COME SUNDOWN by Nora Roberts
When Mustang-tough Bodine Longbow’s long-missing aunt returns to the family ranch in Montana 25 years later with a story of abduction and abuse, Bodine realizes that something really bad is lurking in the mountains. “Roberts always tells a good story that balances romance and suspense, but in this title, the narrative is deeper, the mystery is more layered, and with Alice, Roberts moves into another level of exploring physical and emotional trauma and the powerful balm of family and love.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

SO MUCH BLUE by Percival Everett
“An artist ponders a painting he wants to keep private along with the back stories that inspired it, the secrets that continue to haunt him. Everett continues to wrestle with issues such as artistic identity and inspiration, the relation between artists and their art, the notions of what a narrator reveals and conceals, but rarely have the results been as engrossing as this.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

EXTRAORDINARY ADVENTURES by Daniel Wallace
From the New York Times bestselling author of BIG FISH comes a novel about an ordinary man who wins a free weekend at a beachfront condo in Destin, Florida, and has seventy-nine days to find someone to take with him (ideally, his true love). “Witty, winsome, and wise, Wallace’s tale of pluck and luck is a sweet, satisfying diversion.” — Booklist readmoreremove

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