Articles tagged "Editor’s picks"

LJ Spring 2018 Editors’ Picks

Library Journal‘s editors revealed their Spring 2018 picks, including these five titles:

Kate DiGirolomo, SELF-e Community Coordinator
I’d like to don my metaphorical hipster glasses for a second to proclaim that I knew about L. Penelope’s SONG OF BLOOD & STONE (St. Martin’s, May) before she got the book deal. Her captivating “Earthsinger” series was part of LJ’s SELF-e program, featured among the best fiction the indie world has to offer. In this first installment, magical outcast Jasminda and spy Jack embark on a journey, unexpectedly finding love while trying to save their world from invasion. We’ll certainly miss this one in SELF-e land, but it’ll be exciting to see it reach new audiences—and deservedly so!

Rounding out my novel choices is Shobha Rao’s GIRLS BURN BRIGHTER (Flatiron: Macmillan, Mar.; LJ 1/18). It first caught my attention with its incredible title and then kept it with the two honest, admirable heroines Rao has created. Poornima and Savitha, young women who can see beyond the constraints of their Indian village, will ignite a spark of hope in readers.

Liz French, Senior Editor
And then there’s Weegee, aka Arthur Fellig (1899–1968), the outsize personality and street photographer who prowled the alleys of midcentury Gotham, often scooping the cops at crime scenes and documenting nightlife. New York magazine senior editor Christopher Bonanos tells his story in FLASH: The Making of Weegee the Famous (Holt, Mar.). Thirty of his photographs enhance the work.

Stephanie Sendaula, Associate Editor
Another fascinating book in the same vein is Bryan Mealer’s THE KINGS OF BIG SPRING: God, Oil, and One Family’s Search for the American Dream (Flatiron: Macmillan, Feb.; LJ 2/1/18). After telling myself that I would only read a few pages, I read the entire book in one sitting, engrossed by the fortunes and misfortunes of patriarch John Lewis Mealer and his children and grandchildren, from Georgia to Texas, California to Arizona. Bryan, his grandson, interviews numerous relatives to create a history–turned–collective biography about what it costs personally, professionally, and spiritually to pursue the American Dream. readmoreremove

June is Audiobook Month

Listen up: June is Audiobook Month! And what better way to kick it off than by celebrating Macmillan Audio’s recent Audie Award winners: I’M JUDGING YOU written/read by Luvvie Ajayi (Humor) & DIRTY by Kylie Scott, read by Andi Arndt (Romance)!

Audible just released their Best Audiobooks of 2017 (so far) list and over a dozen Macmillan Audio titles made the list in various categories!

Customer Favorites:
TEARS WE CANNOT STOP, written/read by Michael Eric Dyson

A DOG’S PURPOSE by W. Bruce Cameron, read by William Dufris

ELEVENTH GRAVE IN MOONLIGHT by Darynda Jones, read by Lorelei King

Editor’s Picks
LILLIAN BOXFISH TAKES A WALK by Kathleen Rooney, read by Xe Sands

LETTERS TO A YOUNG MUSLIM, written/read by Omar Saif Ghobash

I LIKED MY LIFE by Abby Fabiaschi, read by Susan Bennett, Dan Bittner, and Therese Plummer

Bios & Memoirs
THE FACT OF A BODY, written/read by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

Mysteries & Thrillers
THE DRY by Jane Harper, read by Steve Shanahan

BEHIND HER EYES by Sarah Pinborough, read by Anna Bentinck, Josie Dunn, Bea Holland, and Huw Parmenter

Romance
TWIST by Kylie Scott, read by Andi Arndt

Young Adult
CARAVAL by Stephanie Garber, read by Rebecca Soler

Most Wished-For Books
BEHIND CLOSED DOORS by B. A. Paris, read by Georgia Maguire

Future Contenders for Book of the Year
GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny, read by Robert Bathurst

Share your love of audiobooks on social media using the hashtag #audiomonth and don’t forget to check out Unabridged Access for the latest listening goodies.

LJ’s Spring 2017 Editors’ Picks

Library Journal recently revealed their Spring 2017 Editors’ Picks, including these three Macmillan books:

“Like many, I have always had an appreciation for all things Jane Austen, whether it be her original novels, their many retellings, or watching Colin Firth as Darcy famously emerge from a lake in a billowy white shirt. Now I’m awaiting Lucy Worsley’s JANE AUSTEN AT HOME (St. Martin’s, Jul.), which sees the author on an enviable research trip through Austen’s many residences, including childhood and holiday houses, schools, and the abodes of relatives. Worsley connects these spaces back to the fictional dwellings of Austen’s characters, emphasizing the thematic importance of home.” — Kate DiGirolomo, SELF-e Community Coordinator
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