Articles tagged "Crime"

New Nonfiction – April 2017

Biographies, histories, manifestos and more! Take a look at the new nonfiction books perfect for your patrons this April:

FEAR CITY: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein
Two starred reviews! “Phillips-Fein, professor of history at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, makes municipal bonds exciting in this painstakingly researched revisionist account of the 1970s fiscal crisis that shook New York to its core. The book should be required reading for all those interested in the past, present, and future of democratic politics.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman, Jr.
One of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017! Yale legal scholar and former public defender James Forman Jr. provides an original and consequential argument about race, crime, and the law, weighing the tragic role that some African Americans themselves play in escalating the war on crime. “The book achieves genuine immediacy, due not only to the topical subject, but also to Forman’s personal experiences within the legal system. Possibly controversial, undoubtedly argumentative, Forman’s survey offers a refreshing breath of fresh air on the crisis in American policing.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

CLIMATE OF HOPE: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet by Michael Bloomberg & Carl Pope
From NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former head of the Sierra Club Carl Pope comes a manifesto on how the benefits of taking action on climate change are concrete, immediate, and immense. “Upbeat, pragmatic, eloquent, and supremely well-informed, Bloomberg and Pope present striking statistics, cogently describe diverse examples of energy reforms and innovations across the U.S. and around the world, and make clear on both personal and social levels why a low-carbon future is possible, necessary, and of great benefit to everyone.” — Booklist, starred review

MANDERLEY FOREVER: A Biography of Daphne du Maurier by Tatiana de Rosnay
The nonfiction debut from beloved international sensation and #1 New York Times bestselling author of SARAH’S KEY: her biography of novelist Daphne du Maurier. “…this outstanding biography will attract du Maurier devotees of all ages.” — Library Journal, starred review

A COLORFUL WAY OF LIVING: How to Be More, Create More, Do More the Vera Bradley Way by Barbara Bradley Baekgaard
From the co-founder of the Vera Bradley empire, an inspirational and practical book that shows women how to reinvent their lives and awaken their full potential, at any age. “This empowering offering is replete with practical strategies for leading a fulfilled life. Baekgaard’s optimistic take on life and values-based leadership style will inspire readers, particularly those already smitten with her company’s colorful goods.” — Publishers Weekly

MY MOTHER’S KITCHEN: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and the Meaning of Life by Peter Gethers
A funny, moving memoir about a son’s discovery that his mother has a genius for understanding the intimate connections between cooking, people and love. “A well-written and engaging memoir, particularly for foodies. Also a great primer on second acts and living (and dying) well.” — Library Journal readmoreremove

Thriller Thursday (3/30/17 Edition)

Crime & cat cozies, oh my! Read on for our #ThrillerThursday picks:

CONVICTION by Julia Dahl
Three starred reviews! In Dahl’s third powerful novel, Rebekah Roberts investigates a murder that occurred in Brooklyn after the Crown Heights riots of 1991, for which the wrong man may have been convicted. “CONVICTION is a cleverly named compelling chronicle…[about] the very meaning of power and poverty, justice, family, and, best of all, hope. Timely and perfect for twenty- and thirtysomething fans of Megan Abbott and Lisa Lutz.” — Booklist, starred review

ALMOST MISSED YOU by Jessica Strawser
A Library Journal “Great First Acts—Debut Novels” pick! A powerful debut that knits parental abduction with devastating secrets unraveling among friends and spouses. “Fans of smart women’s fiction mixed with a fast-paced plot should not miss this startling first novel from the editorial director of Writer’s Digest Magazine.” — Library Journal

THE OUTSIDER by Anthony Franze
A young law clerk finds himself caught in the cross-hairs of a serial killer in this fast-paced thriller set in the high-pressure world of the Supreme Court. “Descriptions of the law and how the Supreme Court operates are engaging, and Franze knows how to showcase the ins and outs of that world without diving into too much legalese…. It’s like a mix of John Grisham and Scott Turow alongside the inner workings of the court system. Toss it all together and the end result is this winning novel.” — Associated Press

FOLLOW ME DOWN by Sherri Smith
In Smith’s debut thriller, Mia Haas is drawn back to the North Dakota town where she grew up when she learns that her twin brother is missing—and that he’s suspected of murdering the high school student he was allegedly having an affair with. “…this fast-moving domestic thriller will satisfy readers of contemporary suspense.” — Booklist

THE NO. 2 FELINE DETECTIVE AGENCY: A Hettie Bagshot Mystery by Mandy Morton
Prepare to be besotted with this first book in a new series that turns the traditional British cozy on its head and features feline crime-solvers. “For lovers of cat cozies, the world that Morton has created will be irresistible.” — Publishers Weekly

What are you reading this #ThrillerThursday? Share your picks with us @MacmillanLib.

Read, Reflect & Discuss

“After a contentious campaign season filled with divisive rhetoric, we are now hearing from our members and in the news media about incidents of bigotry and harassment within our communities. During times like these, our nation’s 120,000 public, academic, school, and special libraries are invaluable allies inspiring understanding and community healing. Libraries provide a safe place for individuals of all ages and backgrounds and for difficult discussions on social issues.— ALA President Julie B. Todaro’s statement on Libraries, the Association, Diversity, and Inclusion

It’s important, now more than ever, to continue reading, reflecting, and engaging in open dialogue about the issues facing us all as a nation. Here are our picks of new and forthcoming titles to help do just that:

TEARS WE CANNOT STOP: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson
As the country grapples with race with anguish and anger at a level not seen since the 60s, one of America’s leading black voices speaks out honestly and provocatively to white America. “University Professor of Sociology at Georgetown University and a leading public intellectual once ranked among the 100 Most Influential African Americans by Ebony magazine, Dyson here expands on his editorial, challenging white America to do its part in improving race relations. Brief yet pointed; with comparisons to James Baldwin’s THE FIRE NEXT TIME and Ta-Nehisi Coates’s BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME.” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

WE GON’ BE ALRIGHT: Notes on Race and Resegregation by Jeff Chang
A provocative and timely collection of essays from a celebrated cultural critic on race, diversity, and resegregation. “Readers seeking remedies to racial discord will instead find a multifaceted history lesson coupled with troubling updates on recent urban upsets within the author’s interconnected discourse. With his galvanizing message, Chang reiterates that while there is much work to be done on the inequality front, the opportunity to ‘get it right’ has not passed us by. A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

I’M JUDGING YOU by Luvvie Ajayi
“Ajayi, known in the social-media sphere as Awesomely Luvvie after her blog, which attracts 500,000 readers a month, has crafted a smart, vividly humorous handbook for the social-media generation, which is all of us. Her ‘do-better’ calls for us to reclaim common sense, compassion, and critical thinking, in both personal and online interactions. Astute and timely advice, wittily presented.” — Booklist, starred review

WHITE RAGE: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson
From the end of the Civil War to our combustible present, an acclaimed historian reframes the conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. “A book that provides necessary perspective on the racial conflagrations in the U.S.” — Kirkus Reviews readmoreremove

Thriller Thursday (11/10/16 Edition)

We’re seeing stars for today’s #ThrillerThursday picks!

UNDER THE MIDNIGHT SUN by Keigo Higashino
Two starred reviews! From acclaimed international bestseller and LibraryReads author Higashino comes a compelling story of a twenty-year-old murder, two teenagers linked by the crime, and a detective’s obsession to finally uncover the truth. “Edgar-nominated Higashino revisits the dangerous codependence of bonds forged in murder with this complex, elegant psychological thriller. A starkly rendered portrayal of modern Japanese culture that will draw fans of fellow Japanese thriller master Natsuo Kirino’s novels and the haunting Scandinavian tales of Karin Fossum.” — Booklist, starred review

BRONX REQUIEM by John Clarkson
James Beck and his crew return—when one of their own is killed almost immediately after he’s released from prison, Beck is determined to learn the truth and supply his own brand of justice. “Beck is much like Lee Child’s Jack Reacher in his skill set but unlike Reacher in working with a close-knit circle. A must for fans of gritty crime fiction.” — Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

For Your Consideration: November 2016 LibraryReads Titles

Nov16LRcollageDownload, read, and nominate your favorite titles for the November 2016* LibraryReads list!

*Nominations are due September 20! Click here for the full list of 2016 deadlines.

TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP by Beatrice Colin
Set against the construction of the Eiffel Tower, this novel charts the relationship between a young widow and an engineer who, despite constraints of class and wealth, fall in love. “Hauntingly melancholic in places, Colin’s story moves like wisps of fog through Parisian streets, capturing moments of both gaiety and tragedy. This exquisitely written, shadowy historical novel will appeal to a wide variety of readers, including fans of the Belle Époque.” — Library Journal, starred review

NetGalleyLogoAvailable on NetGalley. To be pre-approved for an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “To Capture What We Cannot Keep.”*

THIS HOUSE IS MINE by Dörte Hansen
A bestseller in Germany, Hansen’s debut novel is about two strong-willed and very different women who have a connection around a special old house: Vera, a refugee who arrived from East Prussia in 1945, and her niece Anne, who shows up at the house 60 years later with her small son. “Hansen makes this story about the process of healing affecting, real, and memorable.” — Publishers Weekly

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NORMAL by Warren Ellis
In this provocative near-future techno-thriller, a foresight strategist (a.k.a.: people who think about geoengineering and smart cities and ways to evade Our Coming Doom) arrives at Normal Head in the wilds of Oregon to unplug and recover, when a patient goes missing from his locked bedroom, leaving nothing but a pile of insects in his wake. “A crackling, funny, and frightening horror story from a unique voice in genre lit.” — Kirkus Reviews

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THE INHERITANCE by Charles Finch
“In the 10th installment of this Victorian-era series, a Member of Parliament–turned–private detective gets the chance to solve a 30-year-old mystery that involves his boyhood friend. Finch impressively raises the stakes of this tale between tea settings, and his character development is top-notch.” — Kirkus Reviews

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UNDER THE MIDNIGHT SUN by Keigo Higashino
Two starred reviews! From acclaimed international bestseller and LibraryReads author Higashino comes a compelling story of a twenty-year-old murder, two teenagers linked by the crime, and a detective’s obsession to finally uncover the truth. “Edgar-nominated Higashino revisits the dangerous codependence of bonds forged in murder with this complex, elegant psychological thriller. A starkly rendered portrayal of modern Japanese culture that will draw fans of fellow Japanese thriller master Natsuo Kirino’s novels and the haunting Scandinavian tales of Karin Fossum.” — Booklist, starred review

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Library Penance

Caution: serving a community sentence in a library for a minor crime may lead to a career as a mystery writer! It happened to Lance Hawvermale. He shares his experience below and explains how libraries continue to inspire him today:

I once served mandatory community service in a library.

As a crime writer, I need a good run-in with the law as part of my backstory, even if the crime in question was victimless and endangered no one but myself. The judge explained that the infraction would not appear on my permanent record if I agreed to perform 20 hours of service to my fellow Americans… in the local library.

Yes, Your Honor. I was born in that briar patch.

Flashback: A boy with neo-hippie hair is too slow for the track team and too easily bored for wood shop, and so he seeks refuge in the school library. Immediately to his left sits Ray Bradbury (Something Wicked This Way Comes), and on his right is William Goldman (Marathon Man). In between them, the boy feels safe. Safe from bullies. Safe from chemistry class. Safe from the possibility of having to say hello to a real live girl. As that very boy, I can tell you that courage can be shoveled from library shelves. I stormed the Bastille from that poorly padded chair; I followed Poe to a woman in a premature tomb; I stood on the docks beside Jay Gatsby and admired a light on a distant shore. But while I read one chapter after the next, Bradbury kept pushing my hand from the books toward my own pen and paper. He told me to strip-mine metaphors from these pages and then to write about the ore I discovered. The school librarian, at least, thought I was cool.

Flash-forward: This year my novel FACE BLIND is released by Minotaur Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press. readmoreremove

PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2016

Drawn from the 14,000+ titles in Publishers Weekly‘s Fall Announcements issue (available in full here), these Macmillan titles are PW‘s Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2016:
Fiction

HERE I AM by Jonathan Safran Foer
Unfolding over four tumultuous weeks in present-day Washington, D.C., Foer’s first novel in 11 years is the story of a fracturing family in a moment of crisis.

Mystery/Thriller/Crime

THE ONE MAN by Andrew Gross
Bestseller Gross revisits the horrors of WWII in this thriller involving an Allied plot to rescue an atomic physicist from Auschwitz.

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror

INVISIBLE PLANETS: Contemporary Chinese Science Fiction in Translation edited and trans. by Ken Liu
This stellar anthology of 13 stories selected and translated by Liu (the Dandelion Dynasty series) brings the best of Chinese science fiction to anglophones.

EVERFAIR by Nisi Shawl
In this deeply compelling debut novel, Shawl takes readers to an alternate Earth where the inhumane history of the Belgian Congo is brilliantly rewritten when Africa’s indigenous populations learn about steam power.

Comics/Graphic Novels

THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984–1985: A Graphic Memoir by Riad Sattouf
Sattouf’s dark-humored memoir of his dysfunctional family and childhood in Syria continues.

Literary Essays/Criticism/Biographies

GUILTY THING: A Life of Thomas De Quincey by Frances Wilson
The riches-to-rags story of the last of the romantics—a 19th-century opium eater, celebrity journalist, and professional doppelgänger. readmoreremove

B&N Fall 2014 Discover Picks

Barnes & Noble recently announced their Fall 2014 selections for the Discover Great New Writers program and several Macmillan titles made the cut!

FIVES AND TWENTY FIVES by Michael Pitre
We can’t stop talking about former marine Pitre’s deeply affecting debut novel about three men from a road repair platoon in Iraq and the struggles they face in the war and at home. In addition to the Discover pick, it’s a Library Journal Best Summer Debut, was selected for the “Summer/Fall Indies Introduce Promotion” at BEA, and was a featured Maximum Shelf Awareness title. “A war novel with a voice all its own, this will stand as one of the definitive renderings of the Iraq experience.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

THE PLOUGHMEN by Kim Zupan
Library Journal‘s Douglas “Books for Dudes” Lord was really excited at BEA’s “Shout ‘n Share” about this gritty Western mystery in which a young sheriff and a hardened killer form an uneasy and complicated bond. “A fascinating first novel that examines the complexities of two men, opposites in every way, whose lives nevertheless intertwine. With such a strong debut, Zupan’s literary future looks exceptionally promising.” — Library Journal

CATARACT CITY by Craig Davidson
Childhood friends pursue lives on opposite sides of the law in this sweeping literary crime novel from Davidson (RUST AND BONE). “…the characters, audacious sweep of the story, and propulsive noir writing make this novel a standout.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE DOG: Stories by Jack Livings
Livings’ debut collection of stories set in the shifting landscape of contemporary China explores the country’s cultural and social fault lines, revealing a nation accustomed to rations, bitter struggle, and the stranglehold of communism as it confronts a generation rife with the promise of unforeseen prosperity. “Though Livings works as a journalist, his fiction shows a whole lot more than moonlighting potential.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

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FATAL ENQUIRY in NYTBR!

Great news! Tulsa librarian Will Thomas's latest Barker & Llewellyn historical mystery, FATAL ENQUIRY, received a great review in Marilyn Stasio's New York Times Book Review mystery column this past Sunday!

“[A] Classic detective duo…. The best fun in this Big Boys’ Adventure Book is observing [protagonist Cyrus] Barker in action. An autodidact who keeps a French chef in his kitchen and rare penjing trees in his garden, he’s a formidable foe who applies the wits he was born with (and the subversive skills he acquires in Canton) in hand-to-hand combat.” New York Times Book Review (read the full review here)

Additional praise for FATAL ENQUIRY:

“Recommended for historical mysteries enthusiasts, Anglophiles, and Sherlockians. Fans of Alex Grecian, Anthony Horowitz, and Charles Todd should take special note.” Library Journal, starred review

“Readers will relish the appealing characters, clever twists, and colorful vision of late 19th-century London.” — Publishers Weekly

“Well-crafted and immersive, this a great addition to the to-be-read stacks of Thomas’ fans, as well as those of Alex Grecian and Anne Perry’s.” — Booklist

Don't miss Will Thomas at ALA Annual

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Critters & Crime…

To continue our celebration of Booklist's Mystery Month, meet the many cats and dogs dutifully serving alongside our favorite detectives! 

Booklist crime & critters ad 

Team #Meow

THE CAT SITTER'S NINE LIVES by Blaize & John Clement
Pet-sitter and amateur sleuth Dixie Hemingway is back in this ninth installment of Blaize Clement's beloved cozy mystery series, now written by her son John. Dixie rescues a man from a car accident, and a day later strange things start to happen—the man she rescued claims to be Dixie's husband, a bookstore owner and his cat vanish, and a mysterious phone call from a new client lures her to a crumbling, abandoned mansion on the outskirts of town.

BLOOD RUBIES by Jane Cleland
In the ninth book in Cleland's mystery series featuring amateur sleuth/antiques appraiser Josie Prescott, celebrity chef Ana Yartsin—known for her Fabergé egg-shaped cakes, as well as the Fabergé Spring Egg snow globe—is planning the desserts for her friend Heather and Jason's upcoming wedding. When Josie arrives to appraise the snow globe, she finds it smashed and Jason dead.
Meet Jane Cleland at ALA Annual!

DOING IT AT THE DIXIE DEW by Ruth Moose
Winner of the Malice Domestic Competition for Best First Traditional Mystery Novel, Moose's Southern cozy features Beth McKenzie, a proprietor of a bed and breakfast called The Dixie Dew, where guests are being murdered.

THE BEST CAT BOOK EVER! by Kate Funk
OK, OK, it's not a mystery…. But it’s hilarious. 

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