Articles tagged "coming-of-age"

SLJ Best Adult Books 4 Teens 2017

Two Macmillan titles are included in School Library Journal‘s Best Books of 2017 & SLJ’s Best Adult Books 4 Teens list:

DOWN AMONG THE STICKS AND BONES by Seanan McGuire
Escaping a stifling home environment, the Wolcott twins descend a set of stairs that turn out to be a portal to the bleak and brutal world of the Moors. There they find themselves, but not each other, in this beautiful and devastating prequel to EVERY HEART A DOORWAY.

BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
While scrounging for food in a ruined city, Rachel brings home a small creature of unknown origin, whom she names Borne. This unusual dystopian story is also a poignant, harsh, and yet hopeful double coming-of-age. readmoreremove

Stars for THE GREAT ALONE

Kristin Hannah’s THE NIGHTINGALE was a worldwide bestseller and a book club favorite. Now, Hannah’s sure-to-be instant bestseller, THE GREAT ALONE, has already two starred reviews:

“Hannah’s follow-up to her series of blockbuster bestsellers will thrill her fans with its combination of Greek tragedy, Romeo and Juliet-like coming-of-age story, and domestic potboiler. She re-creates in magical detail the lives of Alaska’s homesteaders in both of the state’s seasons (they really only have two) and is just as specific and authentic in her depiction of the spiritual wounds of post-Vietnam America. A tour de force.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Hannah skillfully situates the emotional family saga in the events and culture of the late ’70s—gas shortages, Watergate, Ted Bundy, Patty Hearst, and so on. But it’s her tautly drawn characters—Large Marge, Genny, Mad Earl, Tica, Tom—who contribute not only to Leni’s improbable survival but to her salvation amid her family’s tragedy.” Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

Stars for WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST

In a time of constant protests, it’s easy to forget it all starts with a few voices. WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST: A Black Lives Matter Memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors and asha bandele is the emotional and powerful story about the founding of the Black Lives Matter movement. Both a poetic memoir and empowering account of survival, strength, and resilience, Khan-Cullors’s story asks us to remember that protest in the interest of the most vulnerable comes from love.

We are thrilled that Patrisse Khan-Cullors will be the 2018 ALA Midwinter Opening Session speaker, in conversation with Marley Dias! Plus, WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST has received two starred reviews:

“With great candor about her complex personal life, Khan-Cullors has created a memoir as compelling as a page-turning novel.” — Booklist, starred review

“Steeped in humanity and powerful prose… This is an eye-opening and eloquent coming-of-age story from one of the leaders in the new generation of social activists.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“With assistance from bandele, Khan-Cullors synthesizes memoir and polemic… an important account of coming of age within today’s explosive racial dynamic.” — Kirkus Reviews readmoreremove

Winter 2017-2018 Indie Next Picks for Book Clubs

The Winter 2017-2018 Indie Next List for Reading Groups includes four Macmillan titles!

Top Ten
THE HOUR OF LAND: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks by Terry Tempest Williams
300 ARGUMENTS: Essays by Sarah Manguso

Of Writers and Readers
CABO DE GATA by Eugen Ruge, translated by Anthea Bell

Family and Coming-of-Age
HERE I AM by Jonathan Safran Foer

Find more resources for your book club online at ReadingGroupGold.com.

Friday Reads: Graphic Novels

TGIF! Today’s #FridayReads are three great graphic novels:

POPPIES OF IRAQ by Brigitte Findakly & Lewis Trondheim
Findakly’s nuanced tender chronicle of her relationship with her homeland Iraq, co-written and drawn by her husband, acclaimed cartoonist Trondheim. “Small in size but large in impact, this intimate memoir is a highly relevant and compassionate story of family, community, prejudice, and the struggle to love when the forces of the world push groups apart.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

FROM LONE MOUNTAIN by John Porcellino
Porcellino shares his love of nature as he uproots his comfortable life and travels from small town to small town, experiencing America in slow motion road trip. “The rawness of Porcellino’s work, its unfiltered directness, is the essence of its charm.” — Los Angeles Times readmoreremove

Nonfiction on the Shelves (07/12/17)

Mothers + daughters, a celebrated writer’s home-life, female aviators during WWII and death… All topics explored in today’s featured titles:

I Need a Lifeguard Everywhere but the Pool by Lisa Scottoline, Francesca Serritella

“The Edgar Award–winning Scottoline and her writer daughter, Serritella, have been investigating human foibles in a series that now reaches its eighth title (following I’ve Got Sand in All the Wrong Places). Expect more wit and wisdom; with library marketing.”–LJ Pre-Pub Alert

Coming of Age: The Sexual Awakening of Margaret Mead by Deborah Beatriz Blum

“This biography gives us something equally rich: knowledge of her colorful, defiant, and courageous life—one of nonconformity, gender-bending, and paving new paths. VERDICT Through Blum’s narrative, Mead becomes more than a quotable female pioneer and transforms into a three-dimensional woman.” —Library Journal, starred review

Jane Austen at Home: A Biography by Lucy Worsley

“Worsley gives sharply drawn pictures of domesticity in the many homes that Austen inhabited, including her family’s rented houses in Bath and residences where she, her widowed mother, and sister visited as guests before they settled in Chawton, a site of pilgrimage for Janeites. A charming, well-researched journey to ‘Austen-land.’” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Her book is a lovely excavation of Austen’s home life, in which she provides readers access into places such as Pemberley without ever giving too much of herself away. This volume is sure to delight Austen fans, while Worsley’s examination of manuscripts will make new material accessible to scholars unable to visit the British Library, Hampshire Archives, Kent History and Library Centre, or the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Record Office.” — Library Journal, starred review

The Women Who Flew for Hitler: A True Story of Soaring Ambition and Searing Rivalry by Clare Mulley

“Biographer Mulley comes through in a major way with this deep dive into the lives of WWII–era German aviatrixes Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg…Absolutely gripping, Mulley’s double portrait is a reminder that there are many more stories to tell from this oft-examined time.” — Booklist, starred review

“This compelling work has the drama and suspense of the best movie scripts. It is the perfect choice for lovers of narrative non-fiction, especially those interested in strong females.” — Library Journal, starred review

The Art of Death: Writing the Final Story by Edwidge Danticat

“From ‘The Art of’ series, this emotional, brave work interrogates and bears witness to the ultimate unknown. Will appeal to readers looking for warmth and insight—whatever their personal circumstance.” — Library Journal, starred review

“National Book Critics Circle Award winner Danticat…takes on an unpleasant topic with sensitivity and passion.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

White Man’s Game: Saving Animals, Rebuilding Eden, and Other Myths of Conservation in Africa by Stephanie Hanes

​”For every reader who has ever been inclined to support such heart-tugging philanthropic quests,​ ​Hanes provides a cautionary tale that reveals the complex motives behind such causes and the often​ ​fraudulent machinations needed to bring them to fruition.”–Booklist, starred review

New Nonfiction – May 2017

Essays, books about books, and a librarian’s memoir are just some of the new nonfiction books available this week:

THE END OF EDDY by Édouard Louis
Two starred reviews! The most talked-about European novel since MY STRUGGLE—a sexually frank, brutally honest coming-of-age story that captures the violence and desperation of life in a French factory town. “Translated into 20 languages and a huge hit in France, author Louis’ unsparingly autobiographical novel is the story of a gay boy’s attempts to come to terms with himself. …a seamless, universal portrait of the experience of growing up gay and gradually coming to accept oneself.” — Booklist, starred review

MY LIFE WITH BOB: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues by Pamela Paul
Two starred reviews! The editor of The New York Times Book Review reveals her personal reading journal named BOB (a.k.a. her “Book of Books”) and the books that have shaped her life. “Titles about reading and books abound, but this memoir stands in a class by itself. Bibliophiles will treasure, but the addictive storytelling and high-quality writing will vastly increase its audience. Highly recommended.” — Library Journal, starred review

ONE DAY WE’LL ALL BE DEAD AND NONE OF THIS WILL MATTER by Scaachi Koul
One of Buzzfeed’s “Most Exciting Books Coming In 2017!” For readers of Mindy Kaling, Luvvie Ajayi, and Rupi Kaur comes a debut collection of fierce and funny essays about growing up the daughter of Indian immigrants, addressing sexism, cultural stereotypes and the universal miseries of life by rising star Scaachi Koul. “Simultaneously uproarious and affecting….” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

HOW TO BUILD A TIME MACHINE by Darren Manley
A librarian’s heartfelt memoir about growing up with much older parents and coming to appreciate the bonds that cross generations. readmoreremove

YA-OK Adult Titles for Teens

FridayReads-AB4TThese six titles may have been published for adults, but we think your teens will love ’em too!

MARLENA by Julie Buntin
An April 2017 Indie Next pick, a Barnes & Noble Spring 2017 Discover pick and one of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Spring 2017 Debuts with FOUR starred reviews! An electric debut novel about love, addiction, and loss; the story of two girls and the feral year that will cost one her life, and define the other’s for decades. “Buntin’s prose is emotional and immediate, and the interior lives she draws of young women and obsessive best friends are Ferrante-esque.” — Booklist, starred review

WALKAWAY by Cory Doctorow
Two starred reviews! Cory Doctorow’s first adult novel in eight years: a “sweeping epic” (Booklist, starred review) of revolution, love, post-scarcity, and the end of death. “A truly visionary techno-thriller that not only depicts how we might live tomorrow, but asks why we don’t already.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

UNIVERSAL HARVESTER by John Darnielle
Two starred reviews! Life in a small Iowa town takes a dark turn when mysterious footage begins appearing on VHS cassettes at the local Video Hut. “Darnielle’s masterfully disturbing follow-up to the National Book Award–nominated WOLF IN WHITE VAN reads like several Twilight Zone scripts cut together by a poet.” — Booklist, starred review

IF WE WERE VILLAINS by M.L. Rio
A literary debut in the tradition of Donna Tartt’s THE SECRET HISTORY about a group of seven young actors studying Shakespeare at an elite arts school who find their friendship turned into nasty rivalry that leaves one of them dead after a teacher switches around the in-character casting. “This novel about obsession at the conservatory will thoroughly obsess you.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

THE ROMANCE READERS GUIDE TO LIFE by Sharon Pywell
Two sisters, a murder, a bodice-ripping pirate romance, plus a cross-dressing talking dog! With shades of THE LOVELY BONES combined with the guilty pleasure of a pirate romance: a novel about two sisters coming of age in the 1950s, and what happens when one of them disappears. “Smart, funny, and compulsively readable: this one may finally win the underrecognized author the wider audience her talent deserves.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

OOLA by Brittany Newell
A provocative and impressive debut delivered with a uniquely sinister lyricism by a brilliant 21-year-old; a story about sex, privilege, desire, and creativity in the post-college years. “Newell’s rangy, circuitous tale is a kind of queer Nadja for millennials with a self-satirizing—and satisfying—bite. A dreamy and provocative exploration of sex, privilege, and self-discovery.” — Kirkus Reviews

LJ’s Great First Acts — Debut Novels

LJ S17 debutsFrom astute coming-of-age titles to high-profile pop fiction to books heard ’round the world, these seven Macmillan titles will be some of the most talked-about debuts of the spring 2017 season, according to Library Journal:

HOW TO BE HUMAN by Paula Cocozza
Out: May 9
Out of love and on leave from work, Mary finds comfort in the presence of a gorgeous red fox that has taken to visiting the back garden of her home in the London suburbs. But the neighbors are disturbed. “A compelling, unsettling, and wholly original debut.” (LJ 3/1/17)

THE CITY ALWAYS WINS by Omar Robert Hamilton
Out: June 13
Cofounder of the Palestine Festival of Literature, Hamilton takes us to Cairo as his idealistic protagonist joins the battle in Tahrir Square, then lands in disillusioned exile in New York. Forceful, astonishing writing and a piercing insider’s look at Egypt’s failed revolution.

MARLENA by Julie Buntin
Out: April 4
Relating the story of 15-year-old Cat, new in town and drawn to daring, desperate Marlena, Buntin captures a destructive yet essential relationship with ongoing consequences. A Discover Great New Writers pick; “an exceptional portrait, disturbing and precisely observed.” (Xpress Reviews 3/10/17) readmoreremove

FOUR STARS for MARLENA!

With FOUR phenomenal starred reviews and tons of acclaim, Julie Buntin’s MARLENA is the electric debut novel of 2017 you’ve been looking for!
A Barnes & Noble Spring 2017 Discover pick
One of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Spring 2017 Debuts
An April 2017 Indie Next pick

“In Buntin’s vivid debut, Cath, now a New York City public librarian in her thirties, tells the story of the friendship that changed her forever. Though Cath tells her story in flashbacks, Buntin’s prose is emotional and immediate, and the interior lives she draws of young women and obsessive best friends are Ferrante-esque.” — Booklist, starred review

“In her impressive debut novel, Buntin displays a remarkable control of tone and narrative arc. Buntin is particularly sensitive to the misery of adolescent angst, and Cat’s growing happiness in Marlena’s friendship runs like an electric wire through the narrative. The novel is poignant and unforgettable, a sustained eulogy for Marlena’s ‘glow… that lives in lost things, that sets apart the gone forever.’” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Sensitive and smart and arrestingly beautiful, debut novelist Buntin’s tale of the friendship between two girls in the woods of Northern Michigan makes coming-of-age stories feel both urgent and new. Devastating; as unforgettable as it is gorgeous.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Buntin perfectly captures a burning and essential friendship with lasting consequences and that terrible moment when we make a wrong turn and can’t go back. An exceptional portrait, disturbing and precisely observed; highly recommended.” — Library Journal, starred review readmoreremove

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