Articles tagged "comedy"

In the Hot Seat: Matt Goldman on GONE TO DUST

Today we turn the spotlight on Matt Goldman, whose debut novel, GONE TO DUST, features an unusual crime—a murdered woman is found covered in dust from hundreds of vacuum cleaner bags, rendering DNA evidence useless.

Library Journal‘s Books for Dudes column called it, “hard-boiled awesomeness” and Booklist said, “Offer this one to aficionados of chilly Scandinavian noir and the new generation of Philip Marlowe fans.”

Macmillan Library: Hi Matt, and thanks for joining us for a Q&A on the blog today! Before we talk about your debut mystery, GONE TO DUST, let’s start with your credentials. You began your career as a stand-up comedian and are now a playwright and Emmy Award-winning television writer for Seinfeld, Ellen, and other shows. You must do so much writing for your day job, why write a novel?

Matt Goldman: I love writing and I’m a first-degree introvert. So much of television writing is done in a roomful of writers. Not the actual script writing (usually), but conceiving characters and stories. Much of the rewriting is also done in a group. Especially in comedy. TV writing and writers have taught me so much about character, story, pace, dialogue, and series construction, I wouldn’t trade a minute of it. But for my personality, it’s exhausting trying to track all those words in the air. I love the process of book writing—I find it energizing. And it’s a chance to write my voice without concern for other writers, actors, studios, and networks.

ML: Was it harder or easier for you to write GONE TO DUST vs writing for TV? What are some of the major differences?

MG: Some of the differences I explained above. I guess I don’t look at it as hard vs. easy. They have their tradeoffs by that measurement. It’s a more whole and rewarding experience for me to write books. I’m a serial daydreamer. That serves me better as a novelist than it does in a room where I’m supposed to be paying attention.

ML: Did you have specific inspirations as you wrote GONE TO DUST? It’s lighthearted, but has a very noir feel.

MG: I started reading the mystery/crime genre relatively recently. When I read Raymond Chandler, I saw how my voice could work in telling those kinds of stories. Chandler’s voice and style are different from mine, and his skill far outweighs mine, but he did inspire me to sit down and give it a shot. readmoreremove

What ho?! FOUR stars for JEEVES AND THE WEDDING BELLS!

P.G. Wodehouse was one of the finest comic English writers ever, gifting the world with his delightful duo Bertie Wooster (a young man about town) and his butler, the inimitable Jeeves (the very model of the modern manservant). Now the Wodehouse estate has given their blessing to internationally acclaimed novelist Sebastian Faulks, who has brought Bertie and Jeeves back for the first time in nearly forty years in JEEVES AND THE WEDDING BELLS

In this hilarious affair of mix-ups and mishaps, Bertie agrees to “help” his old friend Peregrine “Woody” Beeching regain his fiancée even though he's nursing a bit of his own heartbreak. Plan A fails spectacularly, and suddenly Jeeves ends up having to impersonate one Lord Etringham, while Bertie plays the part of Jeeves’ manservant “Wilberforce." From there the plot becomes even more hilarious and convoluted, in a brilliantly conceived, seamlessly written comic work worthy of the master himself. 

Critics agree, giving JEEVES AND THE WEDDING BELLS FOUR STARRED pre-pub reviews, with major publicity expected from The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair, CNN.com, and the Daily Beast (to name a few), as well as a December Indie Next pick:

“Faulks has captured Bertie’s voice, his innocent zest and his spirited banter with Jeeves to a fare-thee-well... Faulks has risen to the challenge splendidly with this ‘homage’ to Wodehouse. Jeeves and Wooster live again!”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"OK, fine, this P. G. poseur gets the plot right, but what about the all-important patter, the Bertie-isms and the priceless Bertie-Jeeves dialogue duets. But Faulksie nails it again, evoking rather than imitating, but doing so in perfect pitch. Top drawer!”
Booklist, starred review

Let word go forth, from Mayfair to Herald Square, from Piccadilly to Kansas City: Jeeves and Wooster are back and in fine fettle. After sampling this tasty bonbon, Wodehouse fans and new readers will want to go back to the original series.”
Library Journal, starred review

“In addition to concocting an intricate farce complete with fresh metaphors and literary allusions worthy of the master himself, Faulks has varied the standard Wodehouse formula in ways both subtle and daring. The heartwarming denouement, which reveals how the godlike Jeeves has manipulated the action from behind the scenes, humanizes Bertie and Jeeves as Wodehouse never did. In my humble opinion, Faulks has outdone Wodehouse.”
Publishers Weekly, starred & boxed review


Well done, old chap!
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