Articles tagged "CHASING NEW HORIZONS: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto"

May 2018 Nonfiction

Pluto. Milk. Aviation. Rebellion. Social Media. Meet this month’s new nonfiction titles:

CHASING NEW HORIZONS: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto by Alan Stern & David Grinspoon
Also available in audio
One of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of Summer 2018! A behind the scenes look at the science, politics, egos and public expectations that fueled the greatest space mission of our time: NASA spacecraft New Horizons’ mission to Pluto. “This is a future classic of popular science, full of twists and turns and unexpected heroes, with a dramatic and profound payoff.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

MILK!: A 10,000-Year Food Fracas by Mark Kurlansky
Kurlansky’s first global food history since the bestselling COD and SALT; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy—with recipes throughout. “Kurlansky’s entertaining, fast-paced history of milk exhibits his usual knack for plumbing the depths of a single subject. Kurlansky’s charming history of milk brims with excellent stories and great details.” — Publishers Weekly

THE LOST PILOTS: The Spectacular Rise and Scandalous Fall of Aviation’s Golden Couple by Corey Mead
Also available in audio
“The tale of two intrepid aviators who got caught in a sordid scandal. How the pair ended up in a Miami courtroom is the subject of Mead’s colorful, fast-paced narrative, a tale of ambition, betrayal, lust, and devotion. A brisk, entertaining history of daring and passion.” — Kirkus Reviews

CHOSEN COUNTRY: A Rebellion in the West by James Pogue
Pogue provides a firsthand account of the 2016 anti-government rancher rebellion at Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. “Essential reading for insights into modern public lands politics, especially in the American West.” — Library Journal readmoreremove

PW Best Summer Books of 2018

Publishers Weekly recently announced their Best Summer Books of 2018, including these 9 Macmillan titles:
Top 10 (full list)

NEW POETS OF NATIVE NATIONS, edited by Heid E. Erdrich
Rather than anthologize contemporary and emerging authors alongside classic or familiar ones, Erdrich introduces readers to 21 Native poets whose writing was first published after 2000. It’s a simple, powerful framing and all that is needed to introduce readers to a group of writers whose breadth and diversity of styles represent some of the best of contemporary poetry today. —Alex Green, New England correspondent

Fiction (full list)

BABY TEETH by Zoje Stage
Stage’s debut novel is a deviously fun domestic horror story that takes child-rearing anxiety to demented new heights. Frustrated stay-at-home mom Suzette attempts to pacify her seven-year-old daughter Hanna, who adores her father but distrusts Suzette, has dangerous tantrums, and only speaks in the voice of a 17th-century girl who was burned at the stake. As Suzette tries to connect with Hanna, Hanna plots ways to “step up her game against Mommy.”

BROTHER by David Chariandy
Set during the summer of 1991 in the Park, a housing complex in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, Chariandy’s powerful and incendiary novel tracks the coming of age of two mixed-heritage brothers. Sensitive Michael fumbles through his first relationship while volatile Francis becomes obsessed with the burgeoning hip-hop scene. Chariandy imbues his resilient characters with strength and hope.

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
Cusk’s final book in a trilogy (after OUTLINE and TRANSIT) expertly concludes the story of protagonist British author Faye. Like its predecessors, the novel eschews chronicling Faye’s life via traditional narrative, instead filling each page with conversations with and monologues by the many writers, journalists, and publicists she meets during her travels. As always, Cusk’s ear for dialogue and language is stunning. The author ends Faye’s trilogy with yet another gem.

Mystery (full list)

CAGED by Ellison Cooper
In her debut thriller, Cooper, an anthropologist who has worked as a murder investigator in Washington, D.C., channels “equal parts Kathy Reichs and Thomas Harris” (according to Lisa Gardner). In the basement of a D.C. house, a woman is found dead in a cage—left to slowly starve to death in a cold and calculating experiment with no clear motive. readmoreremove

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