Articles tagged "Biography"

Murder, Medicine, and a Female Longmire

Happy #ThrillerThursday to:

THE BUTCHERING ART: Joseph Lister’s Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine by Lindsey Fitzharris
A Publishers Weekly Fall 2017 Top 10 Science Book with two starred reviews! “British science writer Fitzharris slices into medical history with this excellent biography of Joseph Lister… She infuses her thoughtful and finely crafted examination of this revolution with the same sense of wonder and compassion Lister himself brought to his patients, colleagues, and students.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

DARK SIGNAL by Shannon Baker
The second thrilling Kate Fox novel from critically acclaimed author Shannon Baker, starring a female Longmire. “Set in the Sandhills of western Nebraska, a landscape populated with cattle and windmills, this sophomore effort will appeal to readers who appreciate regional mysteries for their atmosphere.” — Library Journal readmoreremove

Joni Mitchell (Book) Mania!

The weekend is nearly here and we’ve got Joni Mitchell mania for our #FridayReads:

RECKLESS DAUGHTER: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell by David Yaffe
An intimate new biography of Joni Mitchell, drawing on interviews with childhood friends and the cast of famous characters (Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Leonard Cohen, David Crosby, and more) with whom she has crossed paths and influenced, as well as insightful analyses of her famous lyrics, their imagery and style, and what they say about the woman herself. “Dazzling… A shimmering portrait of one artist’s life, illusions and all.” — Booklist, starred review

JONI: The Anthology by Barney Hoskyns
This singular collection charts every major period of Joni Mitchell’s iconic career, as they happened, with interviews, album reviews, and critical appraisal of her music and life. “A must for music lovers.” — Booklist readmoreremove

PRAIRIE FIRES and THE SHADOW DISTRICT are November 2017 LibraryReads Picks!

FANTASTIC NEWS! Macmillan has two books on the November 2017 LibraryReads list!

The #9 pick is PRAIRIE FIRES: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser
“The sesquicentennial observance of the birth of the author of the celebrated Little House books (65 million copies sold in 45 languages) has been the catalyst for the publication of a spate of books, now including this magisterial biography, which surely must be called definitive. Richly documented…. But it is its marriage of biography and history—the latter providing such a rich context for the life—that is one of the great strengths of this indispensable book, an unforgettable American story.” — Booklist, starred review

Available from Metropolitan Books on November 21.

Rounding out the list at #10 is THE SHADOW DISTRICT by Arnaldur Indridason
Two starred reviews! “The award-winning author of the ‘Inspector Erlendur’ series (INTO OBLIVION) continues his modus operandi of simultaneously covering a current and cold case in this new series set during the war years. The inspectors, past and present, are formidable characters, and the blend of police procedural with Icelandic folklore is intriguing. VERDICT While not as dark as lndridason’s previous works, this is a welcome addition from a master of the genre. ” — Library Journal, starred review readmoreremove

Stars for the Women Who Flew for Hitler

Both Library Journal and Booklist love Biographers’ Club Prize-winner Clare Mulley’s THE WOMEN WHO FLEW FOR HITLER—a dual biography of Nazi Germany’s most highly decorated women pilots!

THE WOMEN WHO FLEW FOR HITLER: A True Story of Soaring Ambition and Searing Rivalry by Clare Mulley

 
“Biographer Mulley comes through in a major way with this deep dive into the lives of WWII–era German aviatrixes Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg…Absolutely gripping, Mulley’s double portrait is a reminder that there are many more stories to tell from this oft-examined time.” — Booklist, starred review

 

“This compelling work has the drama and suspense of the best movie scripts. It is the perfect choice for lovers of narrative non-fiction, especially those interested in strong females.” — Library Journal, starred review

June 2017 Nonfiction Stars

Check out these *stellar* nonfiction titles joining your library shelves soon:

JANE AUSTEN AT HOME: A Biography by Lucy Worsley
“Worsley gives sharply drawn pictures of domesticity in the many homes that Austen inhabited, including her family’s rented houses in Bath and residences where she, her widowed mother, and sister visited as guests before they settled in Chawton, a site of pilgrimage for Janeites. A charming, well-researched journey to ‘Austen-land.’” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Her book is a lovely excavation of Austen’s home life, in which she provides readers access into places such as Pemberley without ever giving too much of herself away. This volume is sure to delight Austen fans, while Worsley’s examination of manuscripts will make new material accessible to scholars unable to visit the British Library, Hampshire Archives, Kent History and Library Centre, or the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Record Office.” Library Journal, starred review

THE ART OF DEATH: Writing the Final Story by Edwidge Danticat
“From ‘The Art of’ series, this emotional, brave work interrogates and bears witness to the ultimate unknown. Will appeal to readers looking for warmth and insight—whatever their personal circumstance.” — Library Journal, starred review

“National Book Critics Circle Award winner Danticat…takes on an unpleasant topic with sensitivity and passion.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

June 2017 Fiction Stars

The stars are aligning for these sizzling summer reads:

EMMA IN THE NIGHT by Wendy Walker
“Both twisted and twisty, this smart psychological thriller sets a new standard for unreliable narrators.” — Booklist, starred review

“Walker’s portrayal of the ways in which a narcissistic, self-involved mother can affect her children deepens the plot as it builds to a shocking finale.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE FORGOTTEN GIRL by Rio Youers
“Canadian author Youers makes his U.S. debut with a paranormal thriller distinguished by subtle characterizations and emotionally evocative prose. Harvey’s compelling, moving search for Sally and the truth offers everything that fans of intelligent suspense could wish for.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“How Youers manages to skillfully weave character development into a book filled with edge-of-your-seat action is a testament to his writing skills. This is a smart thriller that also explores the power of love and memory. Highly recommended.” — Booklist, starred review

THE GRIP OF IT by Jac Jemc
“The latest from Jemc is a haunted house tale that toys with the hallmarks of ghost stories—a young city couple moving to a small town, a curmudgeonly neighbor, a spooky legend—to create an exhilarating and unsettling literary page-turner. The conclusion is the perfect cap to a story full of genuine frights.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“A psychological spook story in the best high literary tradition. Shivery and smart. A book that brings the legacy of Henry James into the modern world with great effect.” Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

For Your Consideration: November 2017 LibraryReads Titles

Download, read, and nominate your favorite titles for the November 2017* LibraryReads list!

*Nominations are due September 20! Click here for the full list of 2017 deadlines.

AMERICAN DRIFTER by Chad Michael Murray & Heather Graham
RWA Lifetime Achievement Award and ITW ThrillerMaster Award recipient Heather Graham teams up with celebrated actor and celebrity icon Chad Michael Murray to weave a tale of passion and danger as a young US Army veteran suffering from PTSD drifts around Brazil and falls in love with a gangster’s mistress.

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

NEWCOMER by Keigo Higashino
In international bestseller Keigo Higashino’s new crime novel, newly transferred Tokyo Police Detective Kyochiro Kaga (from LibraryReads pick, MALICE) is assigned to a baffling murder in which the number of suspects keeps multiplying.

To request an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “Newcomer.”*

POISON by Galt Niederhoffer
“An award-winning filmmaker and novelist (she directed the film version of her own work, The Romantics), Niederhoffer typically investigates families under stress. Here, Abigail and Benjamin Borden look to have the perfect marriage, but small lies and shifty denials create tension that escalates into veritable menace. The publicist describes this psychological thriller as ‘stay-up-all-night-to-finish good,’ so be prepared.” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

MURDER IN THE MANUSCRIPT ROOM: A 42nd Street Library Mystery by Con Lehane
“A young woman staffer at New York City’s iconic 42nd Street Library is murdered, and crime fiction curator Raymond Ambler immediately gets involved. Shortly after he learns that the victim was working under an assumed name, the NYPD’s Intelligence Division pulls the case from its homicide division, and Raymond knows something big is up. Second in a series from the author of the Brian McNulty mysteries.” Library Journal, pre-pub alert

To request an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “Murder in the Manuscript Room.”*
readmoreremove

New Nonfiction – April 2017

Biographies, histories, manifestos and more! Take a look at the new nonfiction books perfect for your patrons this April:

FEAR CITY: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein
Two starred reviews! “Phillips-Fein, professor of history at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, makes municipal bonds exciting in this painstakingly researched revisionist account of the 1970s fiscal crisis that shook New York to its core. The book should be required reading for all those interested in the past, present, and future of democratic politics.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman, Jr.
One of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017! Yale legal scholar and former public defender James Forman Jr. provides an original and consequential argument about race, crime, and the law, weighing the tragic role that some African Americans themselves play in escalating the war on crime. “The book achieves genuine immediacy, due not only to the topical subject, but also to Forman’s personal experiences within the legal system. Possibly controversial, undoubtedly argumentative, Forman’s survey offers a refreshing breath of fresh air on the crisis in American policing.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

CLIMATE OF HOPE: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet by Michael Bloomberg & Carl Pope
From NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former head of the Sierra Club Carl Pope comes a manifesto on how the benefits of taking action on climate change are concrete, immediate, and immense. “Upbeat, pragmatic, eloquent, and supremely well-informed, Bloomberg and Pope present striking statistics, cogently describe diverse examples of energy reforms and innovations across the U.S. and around the world, and make clear on both personal and social levels why a low-carbon future is possible, necessary, and of great benefit to everyone.” — Booklist, starred review

MANDERLEY FOREVER: A Biography of Daphne du Maurier by Tatiana de Rosnay
The nonfiction debut from beloved international sensation and #1 New York Times bestselling author of SARAH’S KEY: her biography of novelist Daphne du Maurier. “…this outstanding biography will attract du Maurier devotees of all ages.” — Library Journal, starred review

A COLORFUL WAY OF LIVING: How to Be More, Create More, Do More the Vera Bradley Way by Barbara Bradley Baekgaard
From the co-founder of the Vera Bradley empire, an inspirational and practical book that shows women how to reinvent their lives and awaken their full potential, at any age. “This empowering offering is replete with practical strategies for leading a fulfilled life. Baekgaard’s optimistic take on life and values-based leadership style will inspire readers, particularly those already smitten with her company’s colorful goods.” — Publishers Weekly

MY MOTHER’S KITCHEN: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and the Meaning of Life by Peter Gethers
A funny, moving memoir about a son’s discovery that his mother has a genius for understanding the intimate connections between cooking, people and love. “A well-written and engaging memoir, particularly for foodies. Also a great primer on second acts and living (and dying) well.” — Library Journal readmoreremove

2017 Pulitzer Finalists

Congratulations to our 2017 Pulitzer Prize finalists, THE SPORT OF KINGS by C. E. Morgan (Fiction) & IN THE DARKROOM by Susan Faludi (Biography or Autobiography)!

The Pulitzer Prizes have been honoring excellence in journalism and the arts since 1917. See the full list of winners and nominees here.

css.php