Articles tagged "Best Debuts"

Booklist’s Best Debuts of 2017

Booklist‘s Top 10 First Novels of 2017 list includes two of our favorite debuts:

GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong
Rachel returns home to help her mother care for her father as he struggles with dementia in Khong’s tender, deadpan-funny, and affecting drama about memory, self, and caregiving.

THE RESURRECTION OF JOAN ASHBY by Cherise Wolas
Joan did not want to be a mother, and, sure enough, when she ends up with two sons, all her fears come true in Wolas’ breathtaking novel, which does for motherhood what GONE GIRL (2012) did for marriage.

Booklist’s Best Crime

May is Mystery Month over at Booklist and to celebrate they’ve put together “Best of” reading lists with loads of Macmillan titles! 
Best Crime Novels

Top 10 Crime Fiction

THE CAIRO AFFAIR by Olen Steinhauer
Steinhauer follows his acclaimed Milo Weaver trilogy with a stand-alone that is as emotionally rich as it is layered with intrigue. A career diplomat is shot dead in Budapest in front of his disbelieving wife, who is determined to find out why. This complex tale leaves us with the feeling that, despite all the information won, lost, hoarded, and put to use, the world of intelligence is no stronger than the fragile, fallible human beings who navigate it.

HOW THE LIGHT GETS IN by Louise Penny
Chief Inspector Armand Gamache has a new case involving the murder of the last surviving sister of quintuplets, a woman with ties to Three Pines, the idyllic, off-the-grid village outside Montreal where several of Gamache’s previous adventures have been set. The novel not only puts Gamache in harm’s way but also exposes Three Pines to defilement—a cozy setting under attack from a decidedly hard-boiled world. Another bravura performance from the magnificent Penny.

THE ORPHAN CHOIR by Sophie Hannah
Teetering on the edge of sanity, Louise Beeston retreats to a country home in England, hoping to escape the haunting choir music she hears continually. This riveting stand-alone, in which suspense snowballs to a climax that is all the more dire for its everyday contemporary English setting, is absolutely haunting, in every sense of the word.

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