Articles tagged "Best Debuts"

Library Journal Fall 2019/Winter 2020 Best Debuts

Discover new authors with Library Journal‘s Fall 2019/Winter 2020 Best Debuts round-up!

SF/Fantasy

ORMESHADOW by Priya Sharma
Burning with resentment and intrigue, this fantastical family drama invites readers to dig up the secrets of the Belman family, and wonder whether myths and legends are real enough to answer for a history of sin.

Literary Gems

WHAT IS MISSING by Michael Frank
Suspenseful and gripping, award-winning author Michael Frank’s debut novel is a psychological family drama about a father, a son, and the woman they both love.

Books to Anticipate

SALTWATER by Jessica Andrews
This “luminous” (The Observer) feminist coming-of-age novel captures in sensuous, blistering prose the richness and imperfection of the bond between a daughter and her mother.

THE YELLOW BIRD SINGS by Jennifer Rosner
In Poland, as World War II rages, a mother hides with her young daughter, a musical prodigy whose slightest sound may cost them their lives.

SAINT X by Alexis Schaitkin
A haunting portrait of grief, obsession, and the bond between two sisters never truly given the chance to know one another.

LJ’s Best Fall 2018 & Winter 2019 Debuts

Library Journal‘s best debuts of Fall 2018 & Winter 2019 include these 7 Macmillan titles:

A BORROWING OF BONES by Paula Munier
Both traumatized by war, retired soldier Mercy Carr and her bomb-sniffing Belgian Malinois Elvis are running in the Vermont woods when Elvis discovers an abandoned baby, which brings in state game warden Troy Warner and his search-and-rescue Newfoundland. An LJ Mystery Debut of the Month; read for “the believable dogs, the touches of humor, the independent, determined Mercy, and well-crafted characters.” (LJ 9/1/18)

HEARTS OF THE MISSING by Carol Potenza
Pueblo police sergeant Nicky Matthews investigates the suicide of a young woman linked to missing Fire-Sky tribal members who need intervention or their spirits will be condemned to wander. Winner of the Tony Hillerman Prize; “this action-packed mystery…vividly evokes the beauty of the New Mexico landscape and its indigenous peoples.” (LJ 8/18)

WOMAN WORLD by Aminder Dhaliwal
Originally serialized through Disney animation director Dhaliwal’s Instagram account, this graciously illustrated graphic novel imagines a world where men have died out owing to a genetic defect and women are rebuilding society. Mostly black-and-white artwork (so the color bits really mean something); “it’ll be hard to find a funnier, more moving or original debut this year.” (LJ 9/1/18) readmoreremove

Booklist’s Best Debuts of 2017

Booklist‘s Top 10 First Novels of 2017 list includes two of our favorite debuts:

GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong
Rachel returns home to help her mother care for her father as he struggles with dementia in Khong’s tender, deadpan-funny, and affecting drama about memory, self, and caregiving.

THE RESURRECTION OF JOAN ASHBY by Cherise Wolas
Joan did not want to be a mother, and, sure enough, when she ends up with two sons, all her fears come true in Wolas’ breathtaking novel, which does for motherhood what GONE GIRL (2012) did for marriage.

Booklist’s Best Crime

May is Mystery Month over at Booklist and to celebrate they’ve put together “Best of” reading lists with loads of Macmillan titles! 
Best Crime Novels

Top 10 Crime Fiction

THE CAIRO AFFAIR by Olen Steinhauer
Steinhauer follows his acclaimed Milo Weaver trilogy with a stand-alone that is as emotionally rich as it is layered with intrigue. A career diplomat is shot dead in Budapest in front of his disbelieving wife, who is determined to find out why. This complex tale leaves us with the feeling that, despite all the information won, lost, hoarded, and put to use, the world of intelligence is no stronger than the fragile, fallible human beings who navigate it.

HOW THE LIGHT GETS IN by Louise Penny
Chief Inspector Armand Gamache has a new case involving the murder of the last surviving sister of quintuplets, a woman with ties to Three Pines, the idyllic, off-the-grid village outside Montreal where several of Gamache’s previous adventures have been set. The novel not only puts Gamache in harm’s way but also exposes Three Pines to defilement—a cozy setting under attack from a decidedly hard-boiled world. Another bravura performance from the magnificent Penny.

THE ORPHAN CHOIR by Sophie Hannah
Teetering on the edge of sanity, Louise Beeston retreats to a country home in England, hoping to escape the haunting choir music she hears continually. This riveting stand-alone, in which suspense snowballs to a climax that is all the more dire for its everyday contemporary English setting, is absolutely haunting, in every sense of the word.

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