Articles tagged "BACK OF BEYOND"

Our #LibFaves17 Picks

We enjoyed seeing so many of you participate in #LibFaves17 (thanks for making Jane Harper’s THE DRY an official 2017 Top Ten pick!).

Now here are OUR #LibFaves17 picks (aka our 2017 “Recommended Reads” from the newsletter):

Talia

THE MAP THAT LEADS TO YOU by J.P. Monninger
Also available in audio
Finally, a book version of that romantic trilogy of films that Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy collaborated on… And most especially reminiscent of BEFORE SUNRISE. I’m also fondly reminded of the first boy that I ever fell in love with, his name was Lenny Grant, we were both sixteen and attending a summer writing program in Boston. It may as well have been Europe…

THE STANDARD GRAND by Jay Baron Nicorvo
THE STANDARD GRAND is reminiscent of Frank Bill’s CRIMES IN SOUTHERN INDIANA in terms of its grittiness and the ragtag group of misfit anti-heroes trying to survive in the wilderness. And I’ve always loved reading novels that were written in a sort of rushed exuberance—as if the author just had to share his or her story…

KNIFE CREEK by Paul Doiron
Also available in audio
Paul Doiron’s Mike Bowditch (my favorite bad-ass—does everything on his own terms—Maine game warden) is back for more! In KNIFE CREEK, Mike and his girlfriend Stacy (a bit of a rogue operator herself) are hunting wild rampaging boars that are destroying their beautiful town and surrounding environs. During the hunt, the couple discovers a dead infant in a shallow grave. Mike is a game warden but he’s got the instincts of a seasoned detective and must find out who committed such a gruesome deed. He just can’t help himself. And I love him for that. A home explosion that nearly kills him, an encounter with two very strange “sisters” wearing matching red wigs—one of whom may or may not be a long-dead co-ed (or was she kidnapped?), and a small town that’s full of suspects… Mike’s clearly on to something here, but what?

FRESH COMPLAINT by Jeffrey Eugenides
Also available in audio
I’ve always loved short story collections (see Shobha Rao’s AN UNRESTORED WOMAN, Tom Perrotta’s NINE INCHES, David Bezmozgis’ NATASHA, Helen Ellis’ AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE, Lauren Holmes’ BARBARA THE SLUT, James Franco’s PALO ALTO). The intensity of dipping into a life, briefly, and popping right out of it again… Of meeting someone at a particularly vulnerable and strangely fascinating moment in their lives… Of sharing that moment with them but never fully knowing when it began or where it ends is particularly exciting to me. And in Jeffrey Eugenides’ new short story collection FRESH COMPLAINT, meditations abound on life at every stage and at its most banally bizarre moments. Readers are thrown into a period of post-college idealism (and dysentery), mid-life pregnancies (and an ensuing tragicomedy), rebuilding after failure, sex studies in the jungle (and leaving one’s inhibitions behind), the worshiping of a musical instrument, a green card marriage and finally death. And we are treated to it all with a healthy dose of slightly off-beat characters.

THE WIFE BETWEEN US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
Also available in audio
There’s a marketing specialist at Macmillan whose taste in books I trust completely. I will not name names, because she is my secret “book Santa” and I refuse to share her. Since 2004, she has very occasionally sent me manuscripts to read. She has always chosen a book that I end up loving, hating deeply, or at the very least ends up inciting an incredibly visceral reaction. I won’t list the favorites she’s sent, because her identity will most certainly be revealed. And now let’s talk about her latest manuscript, THE WIFE BETWEEN US. There is no train. There is no girl. There is drinking (all good stories need alcohol, right?). There is an unreliable narrator (but those are the most intriguing, aren’t they?). There is a handsome husband (marriages are always fascinating to dissect, good or bad!). There is “another” woman (a thriller always needs a mysterious “other,” right?). And that’s all I can tell you. Read it. And let’s talk about that ending.

INDECENT by Corinne Sullivan
An insecure shy teacher’s apprentice barely out of college at an all boys boarding school is tempted by the popular boy… He’s brash, he’s arrogant, he’s the leader of the pack… But, will she do what’s right? I can’t help but think of the only younger man that I ever dated. During the summer before I went off to college I dated a rising senior. He wore Polo cologne, had long hair and we spent most of that summer in hidden corners and behind closed doors. But it’s not the same, is it? readmoreremove

Booklist’s Best Crime 2015

 

May is Mystery Month over at Booklist and to celebrate they’ve put together “Best of” reading lists with loads of Macmillan titles!
Plus, Booklist Reader has a special feature on one of our favorite mystery authors…

The Year’s Best Crime Novels: 2015

THE LONG WAY HOME by Louise Penny
With her beloved series hero, former Montreal Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, now retired, Penny moves from finding reasons to get Gamache back to his beloved village of Three Pines to taking him on a road trip, first to Europe and then to the wilds of Canada’s upper St. Lawrence River. As always, Penny dexterously combines suspense with psychological drama, overlaying the whole with an all-powerful sense of landscape as a conduit to meaning. Another gem from an endlessly inventive writer.

THE WHITES by Harry Brandt
Richard Price returns as Harry Brandt with the story of Billy Graves, an aging NYPD cop who suspects that one of his cronies in the Wild Geese, a legendary anti-crime unit from the nineties, may now be killing the crooks who got away back in the day. With one-of-a-kind characters and settings so real you can smell them, The Whites isn’t about cops and killers as much it’s about the damage we all carry, the sins we’ve all committed, and the heartbreaking unlikeliness of forgiveness. An unrelenting, moving story of crime and social justice.

Best Crime Fiction Debuts

AN APPETITE FOR VIOLETS
by Martine Bailey

Set in the 1770s, Bailey’s debut stars Biddy Leigh, undercook at Mawton Hall in Cheshire, England, who accompanies the master’s wife on a trip to Italy, where she falls in love with a chef and is thrown into a murder case. A delectable dish for foodies and the Downton Abbey crowd.

NIGHT OF THE JAGUAR by Joe Gannon
Gannon places a classic hard-boiled detective in the middle of 1980s Nicaragua, with its poisonous politics, and tells the story of the times in emotion-drenched, wonderfully lyrical prose.

Top 10 Crime Fiction Audiobooks

THE BLACK-EYED BLONDE by Benjamin Black, read by Dennis Boutsikaris
Boutsikaris steps into Marlowe’s shoes as he narrates the search for a dead man who might not be dead at all. Set in the 1950s and true to Chandler’s creation, this is a memorable visit to the mean streets. readmoreremove

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Kirkus Reviews’ Best Fiction of 2011:

As previously mentioned, we're in that magical time of year when we get our year-end "best of" lists and our to-read/holiday wish lists expand exponentially!

Today we're taking a look at Kirkus Reviews' excellent list of the Best Books of 2011 in fiction. There are quite a few Macmillan gems on this list (if I do say so myself!). But you don't have to take my word for it...

AMERICAN MASCULINE by Shann Ray
BACK OF BEYOND by C.J. Box
THE HUM AND THE SHIVER by Alex Bledsoe
THE LEFTOVERS by Tom Perrotta
THE KING OF DIAMONDS by Simon Tolkien
THE MARRIAGE PLOT by Jeffrey Eugenides
ORIENTATION AND OTHER STORIES by Daniel Orozco
NOW YOU SEE ME by S.J. Bolton
PARTITIONS by Amit Majmudar
RIZZO'S FIRE by Lou Manfredo
THE QUANTUM THIEF by Hannu Rajaniemi
SCHOLAR by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
THE SISTERS by Nancy Jensen
THE SLY COMPANY OF PEOPLE WHO CARE by Rahul Bhattacharya
SPELLBOUND by Blake Charlton
STEALING MONA LISA by Carson Morton
THE TRINITY SIX by Charles Cumming
THE SUBMISSION by Amy Waldman
WHEN THE SAINTS by Dave Duncan
WITH FATE CONSPIRE by Marie Brennan

Minotaur was very enthusiastic about this list!

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