Articles tagged "anxiety"

Day’s YA – CHOOSE WONDER OVER WORRY

Hello again YA librarians!

Welcome to the 10th edition of Day’s YA! I don’t know about you, but I’ve been craving uplifting and inspiring books lately to get me through these last weeks of winter. Now, don’t get me wrong, I love winter—I really do—but even I look forward to spring come mid-March. And this book is the perfect remedy for anyone with a case of the winter blues.

CHOOSE WONDER OVER WORRY by Amber Rae
9781250175250
Available May 15, 2018 from Wednesday Books
Also available in audio and read by the author

“Wonder is what we’re born with. Worry is what we learn.”

In this semi-autobiographical guidebook-to-life, Amber Rae uses a combination of short stories, self-help tips, and prompted journal pages to help her readers push past their fears and realize the amazing things they are capable of. With chapters on self-doubt, procrastination, envy, imposter syndrome, perfectionism, and a whole host of other relevant topics, each short chapter includes a topical anecdote from the author’s life, helpful tips, and a page for journaling, mapping, or doodling. readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Patience & Anxiety

Patience and anxiety are a big part of our two #FridayReads picks, but (SPOILER ALERT) both end in happiness:

THE ART OF WAITING: On Fertility, Medicine, and Motherhood by Belle Boggs
A September 2016 Indie Next pick, a Fall 2016 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers pick, and one of Buzzfeed’s “21 Incredible New Books You Need To Read This Fall!” “So much more than a memoir about trying to conceive. In her reporting, researching, and sharing, Boggs has performed a public service for those in a similar position—and for anyone interested in the implications of parenthood or in a story well-told and deeply felt.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

AMERICA THE ANXIOUS: How Our Pursuit of Happiness Is Creating a Nation of Nervous Wrecks by Ruth Whippman
British journalist and documentary filmmaker Whippman embarks on an uproarious pilgrimage to explore America’s obsession with the pursuit of happiness. “A hilarious narrative full of barbed observations, personal anecdotes, and comical stories. … A delightfully witty, enjoyable read.” ― Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Her witty, insightful observations are supported by convincing data, as she pulls back the curtain to reveal the seedy side of the business of happiness. Recommended to readers interested in the psychology of happiness or anxiety and especially those looking for an alternative to the multitude of ‘how-to’ books on the subject.” — Library Journal

Share your #FridayReads with us @MacmillanLib. Happy weekend!

FURIOUSLY HAPPY hits the September 2015 LibraryReads List!

FANTASTIC NEWS! Jenny Lawson’s FURIOUSLY HAPPY is the #7 pick on the September 2015 LibraryReads list!

A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a terrible idea. But terrible ideas are what Jenny Lawson does best!

As Jenny says: “Furiously happy is about taking those moments when things are fine and making them amazing, because those moments are what make us who we are, and they’re the same moments we take into battle with us when our brains declare war on our very existence. It’s the difference between ‘surviving life’ and ‘living life.’ It’s the difference between ‘taking a shower’ and ‘teaching your monkey butler how to shampoo your hair.’ It’s the difference between being ‘sane’ and being ‘furiously happy.’”

“Kudos to Lawson for being a flagrant and witty spokesperson for this dark subject matter.” — Kirkus Reviews

Click to listen to a clip of FURIOUSLY HAPPY, read by Jenny Lawson

Available from Flatiron Books and Macmillan Audio on September 22.

See the complete September 2015 list at LibraryReads.org.

And now, a special message from Jenny Lawson:

I just found out that FURIOUSLY HAPPY was picked as one of the 10 LibraryReads for September. This nod is one of the most poignant honors I have ever received. I cried when I heard it, although not everyone would understand why.

When I was little my favorite places were libraries. You weren’t expected to speak, which was heaven for a shy girl with an anxiety disorder. Thousands of small secret stories were hidden in plain sight all around you, just waiting to be held in your hands and discovered. As a small girl in rural Texas, I knew that the best chance I had of seeing worlds that would never be open to me, and meeting fantastic people I’d never be bold enough to speak to, was through books. I was able to see places that existed (or that had existed, and/or would never exist) through the words of the storytellers whose worlds had been bound up and shared and protected through generations of docent-guardians who called themselves “librarians.”

I don’t remember my mother ever playing with my sister or me, but she read during any spare second she had. She read to us. She read to herself. She had us read to each other. A few times a month we’d get dressed up to drive into town to visit the nearest library. I still remember the reverent hush that greeted us as we walked through the doors . . . the quiet hum of the air conditioner . . . the feeling of reverence that others may have experienced in church but which I found in the quiet awe that was the library. I remember breathing in the welcoming smell of the dust of the books. The soft sounds of the drawers of wooden card-catalogs that had slid open and closed so many, many times that they became a velvety hush. The clean white slips of paper and tiny pencils waiting there (for free!) so that you might look up something wonderful and write down the secret code that would lead you to treasure. I remember the hunt for the book. For adventure. For magic.

And sometimes you’d get lucky and there would be a special librarian there. Of course, all librarians were special when you were little. They were the guards and they were larger than life. They knew the secret codex of books. They were good witches and wizards who kept small keys around their necks, keys to special, sacred artifacts you had to know the secret password to see.

The librarians were all magical in their own way, but some had a special gift, as if they could see behind your eyes. They could look at you, measuring you in their heads, and say: readmoreremove

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