Articles tagged "American History"

New Nonfiction – April 2017

Biographies, histories, manifestos and more! Take a look at the new nonfiction books perfect for your patrons this April:

FEAR CITY: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein
Two starred reviews! “Phillips-Fein, professor of history at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, makes municipal bonds exciting in this painstakingly researched revisionist account of the 1970s fiscal crisis that shook New York to its core. The book should be required reading for all those interested in the past, present, and future of democratic politics.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman, Jr.
One of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017! Yale legal scholar and former public defender James Forman Jr. provides an original and consequential argument about race, crime, and the law, weighing the tragic role that some African Americans themselves play in escalating the war on crime. “The book achieves genuine immediacy, due not only to the topical subject, but also to Forman’s personal experiences within the legal system. Possibly controversial, undoubtedly argumentative, Forman’s survey offers a refreshing breath of fresh air on the crisis in American policing.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

CLIMATE OF HOPE: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet by Michael Bloomberg & Carl Pope
From NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former head of the Sierra Club Carl Pope comes a manifesto on how the benefits of taking action on climate change are concrete, immediate, and immense. “Upbeat, pragmatic, eloquent, and supremely well-informed, Bloomberg and Pope present striking statistics, cogently describe diverse examples of energy reforms and innovations across the U.S. and around the world, and make clear on both personal and social levels why a low-carbon future is possible, necessary, and of great benefit to everyone.” — Booklist, starred review

MANDERLEY FOREVER: A Biography of Daphne du Maurier by Tatiana de Rosnay
The nonfiction debut from beloved international sensation and #1 New York Times bestselling author of SARAH’S KEY: her biography of novelist Daphne du Maurier. “…this outstanding biography will attract du Maurier devotees of all ages.” — Library Journal, starred review

A COLORFUL WAY OF LIVING: How to Be More, Create More, Do More the Vera Bradley Way by Barbara Bradley Baekgaard
From the co-founder of the Vera Bradley empire, an inspirational and practical book that shows women how to reinvent their lives and awaken their full potential, at any age. “This empowering offering is replete with practical strategies for leading a fulfilled life. Baekgaard’s optimistic take on life and values-based leadership style will inspire readers, particularly those already smitten with her company’s colorful goods.” — Publishers Weekly

MY MOTHER’S KITCHEN: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and the Meaning of Life by Peter Gethers
A funny, moving memoir about a son’s discovery that his mother has a genius for understanding the intimate connections between cooking, people and love. “A well-written and engaging memoir, particularly for foodies. Also a great primer on second acts and living (and dying) well.” — Library Journal readmoreremove

Nonfiction All-Stars

We’re seeing lots of stars for these terrific nonfiction titles:

THE NOVEL OF THE CENTURY: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables by David Bellos — 3 stars!
“A renowned French translator explores the life and legacy of Les Misérables. Anyone who loves Hugo, France, and the French language will revel in this delightful book that explains all the intimacies of 19th-century French life.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The story of how Victor Hugo’s classic novel came to life is a challenging, complex, and utterly engrossing epic all its own.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The astonishing story of a story.” — Booklist, starred review

INFERNO: A Doctor’s Ebola Story by Steven Hatch, M.D. — 3 stars!
“Hatch, a physician and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, rivetingly recounts his work in an Ebola treatment unit in Liberia at the height of the deadly West African outbreak in 2014–2015. Hatch’s chronicle is a compassionate, clear-eyed, and courageous account of how compassionate medical care proves a formidable force against the ravages of Ebola.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“…an outstandingly well-written, page-turning memoir…nothing short of a literary miracle. This is a masterful work that deserves sharp notice—truly, a game changer that should share a shelf with the works of Philip Gourevitch and Adam Hochschild.” — Booklist, starred review

“Hatch’s writing is elegant, and at times deeply moving as he shares the pathos of his patients, the staff of the treatment unit, and his own hopes and frustrations. Readers who are interested in global health, medical education, and biographies in general will be moved by this account for its humanity, honesty, and lucid writing.”
Library Journal, starred review

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“The Library of Congress Goes to War” in AMERICAN TREASURES (+ a Giveaway!)

In AMERICAN TREASURES: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Gettysburg Address, Stephen Puleo tells the dramatic, never-before-told history of America’s efforts to protect the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Gettysburg Address, plus the key role played by Librarian of Congress Archibald MacLeish during WWII.

Stephen Puleo has a message for you, but first, we’re giving away finished copies to the first 5 librarians to email Library@MacmillanUSA.com from your professional/library-issued e-mail address (subject: American Treasures). Make sure to include your library’s mailing address. Good luck!

UPDATE 8/31/16: This giveaway is now closed and the winners have been notified.

Praise for AMERICAN TREASURES:

An engrossing account of the creation, consecration, and conservation of the documents that defined American democracy. Readers will take away a new appreciation for the vision and savvy of government officials in finding ways to insure such treasures would survive.” — Library Journal

“A solid retelling of an inspiring story.” — Kirkus Reviews

“This unique, easily digestible, well-researched saga is ideal for general readers.” Booklist

“Stephen Puleo once again educates, enlightens, and entertains us, this time through the history of the most important documents of our democracy. A tour de force based on exhaustive research into both primary and secondary sources, he tells the miraculous stories of the survival of the most precious evidence of our freedom thanks to, until now, the unsung heroes and heroines of our past.” — David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, National Archives, Washington D.C.

And now, a message from author Stephen Puleo…

Dear Librarian,
First, I want to say what a privilege it has been to work with so many wonderful librarians while researching my books over the years. I have spent a large part of my author life seeking help from librarians and I’m always amazed and impressed with the thoroughness, professionalism, and cheerfulness with which they approach their work. I owe librarians a debt of gratitude.

I’m writing today to let you know that my sixth book, AMERICAN TREASURES: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Gettysburg Address, will be published this fall by St. Martin’s Press – and I’m very excited about it. For the first time, the book tells the full story of the unprecedented effort to preserve the documentary history of American democracy, focusing on the nation’s “crown jewels” – our most important and priceless documents. readmoreremove

Graphic Novels for the Classroom & School Libraries!

This first book in the Great American Documents series (GREAT AMERICAN DOCUMENTS, Volume 1: 1620-1830 by Ruth Ashby and illustrated by Ernie Colón) tells the history of America through twenty of the major speeches, laws, proclamations, court decisions, and essays that shaped it between 1620 and 1830. 

It's already received two starred reviews! 

“[Ashby and Colón] breathe accessible and cogent life into the written documents that formed U.S. policy, beginning with the Mayflower Compact (1620) and ending with the Indian Removal Act (1830)... Colón uses well-designed, full-color panel layouts to eloquently blend charts and other informative graphics with straightforward images of events, clothing, and customs as well as clear, concise metaphors, all with an eye toward promoting a solid understanding of the basic facts and their impact... School libraries would do well to include this engaging volume in their history collections.” — Booklist, starred review

“Using notable treatises, pamphlets, laws, proclamations, and other documents, [The Great American Documents]—which begins with the Mayflower Compact and ends with the Monroe Doctrine and the Indian Removal Act—weaves together nearly two dozen vignettes with clarity and synthesis. Most remarkably, it covers the culture and context of each time period with a balanced truthfulness... For those who aren’t just curious about history but who really want to understand it, this is an exemplary volume.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The cartoon approach helps refresh history and make it come alive. A good primer for students and a refresher course for their parents.” — Kirkus Reviews

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