Articles tagged "American Revolution"

LJ Mystery Spotlight Cover Girl: Zoje Stage

We’re thrilled to see Zoje Stage gracing the cover of the April 15, 2018 issue of Library Journal!

The BABY TEETH author did an extensive Q&A with LJ (shout-out to Talia “the terror” Sherer‘s PLA book buzz to a crowd of 1,000 librarians, which made BABY TEETH the most requested giveaway ARC in our booth!), and it was included with seven other Macmillan mysteries in a genre spotlight:

Hector DeJean, associate publicity director of St. Martin’s Minotaur Books imprint, says, “Thrillers focusing on family, marriage, and other domestic relationships have proven wildly popular, and in forthcoming books by Jennifer Hillier and Sandie Jones these intimate connections of family and friendship—beyond married couples—turn deadly.” In JAR OF HEARTS (Jun.), Hillier delves into the story of a woman who survived a relationship with a dangerous boyfriend and kept secrets about her best friend’s murder, while Jones, in her debut, THE OTHER WOMAN (Aug.), focuses on a woman facing an increasingly manipulative mother-in-law.

Anxieties about motherhood and the parent-child relationship are driving other domestic thrillers. Coming in July from St. Martin’s is Zoje Stage’s chilling debut, BABY TEETH, in which silent and emotionally detached seven-year-old Hanna conspires to kill her mother. St. Martin’s executive editor Jennifer Weis devoured the book in one sitting. “I couldn’t look away as it exposed family truths, a child’s threat to her parents’ relationship, and a continuous feeling of impending doom with dire consequences. WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN meets GONE GIRL meets THE OMEN—it hits all the right notes.” readmoreremove

Booklist’s Top Arts Books of 2016

Booklist recently unveiled their Top Arts Books of 2016*, including these Macmillan titles, and Bill Ott gave a preview of IDENTITY UNKNOWN by Booklist‘s own Donna Seaman!
Top 10 Arts Books: 2016 (full list)

THE LONELY CITY: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone by Olivia Laing
Laing imaginatively entwines memoir with profiles and astute interpretations as she looks to visual art in an effort to understand the true nature of loneliness.

MAD ENCHANTMENT: Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies by Ross King
With deep knowledge and mesmerizing skill, King tells the little-known story behind Monet’s 30-year effort to paint his magnificent Water Lilies at Giverny.

OF ARMS AND ARTISTS: The American Revolution through Painters’ Eyes by Paul Staiti
Staiti vividly profiles the five artists whose paintings helped inspire the vision of independence and unity that generated the American Revolution and the forging of a new nation.

Core Collection: Architects and Architecture in (Mostly) America (full list)

ARCHITECTURE’S ODD COUPLE: Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson by Hugh Howard
Howard portrays two iconic, outspoken, twentieth-century architects whose provocative ideas and innovative designs transformed America’s built environment, two artists who “were the yin and the yang, …the positive and negative charges that gave architecture its compass.”

BRICKS AND MORTALS: Ten Great Buildings and the People They Made by Tom Wilkinson
As the real-estate market recovers from a decade-long recession and new towers rise at breakneck speed around the globe, Wilkinson skillfully evaluates 10 notable structures, past and present.

THE FLATIRON: The New York Landmark and the Incomparable City That Arose with It by Alice Sparberg Alexiou
Alexiou, whose grandfather was once a co-owner of the Fuller Building, the New York landmark known as the Flatiron, recounts a tale of architectural innovation and the larger-than-life personalities responsible for this iconic structure, including the visionary architect and urban designer Daniel Burnham.

HOW ARCHITECTURE WORKS: A Humanist’s Toolkit by Witold Rybczynski
Architect and outstanding architectural writer Rybczynski takes palpable pleasure in revealing the complex, often contradictory demands of architecture, illuminating “the practical as well as the aesthetic” in this expert and invigorating guide to the field’s profound humanness. readmoreremove

Nonfiction Stars

The stars are aligning for these forthcoming nonfiction titles:

OF ARMS AND ARTISTS: The American Revolution Through Painters’ Eyes by Paul Staiti — THREE STARS!
“This is an impressive, ambitious undertaking, to tell the stories of five painters—Charles Willson Peale, John Singleton Copley, John Trumbull, Benjamin West, and Gilbert Stuart—while simultaneously showing how they were all interrelated and doing this against the complex history of the American Revolution. A lively, splendid history that captures the times with insight, acumen, and a juggler’s finesse.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Highly recommended for those who want to learn about the American Revolution, art history, and message in medium.” — Library Journal, starred review

“As he interprets a vast amount of material with vigor and pleasure, Staiti brings new vibrancy and meaning to boldly revolutionary paintings that both commemorate the suffering, conviction, and valor of a specific time and address the timeless struggle for justice and freedom.” Booklist, starred review

THE POPE OF PHYSICS: Enrico Fermi and the Birth of the Atomic Age by Gino Segrè & Bettina Hoerlin
“By placing stunning scientific advances into historical context, this engaging biography of Nobel Prize–winning Italian physicist Enrico Fermi (1901–1954) captures the life and times of one of the 20th century’s most creative and hard-working scientists. Segrè and Hoerlin draw an engaging portrait of a man with boundless curiosity who delighted in his work; fans of pop science and history will thoroughly enjoy this entertaining and accessible biography of a scientist who deserves to be better understood.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review
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Military History Roundup

History comes to life through fact and fiction in these books about World War II, the American Revolution, and our founding documents:

KILLING THE RISING SUN: How America Vanquished World War II Japan by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard
The latest book in O’Reilly & Dugard’s multimillion-selling Killing series takes readers to the bloody tropical-island battlefields of Peleliu and Iwo Jima and to the embattled Philippines, where General Douglas MacArthur has made a triumphant return and is plotting a full-scale invasion of Japan. Meanwhile, Harry Truman ascends to the presidency, only to face the most important political decision in history: whether or not to use nuclear weapons.

BORDERS by Roy Jacobsen
A brilliantly layered, sweeping novel of World War II set in the Ardennes—a forested, mountainous borderland that spans France, Germany, Belgium, and Luxembourg—about the impossible choices between familial love and national identity. “An artful deconstruction of nationalism through the prism of personal loss and reconciliation. Read Jacobsen’s novel carefully to savor its images and themes.” — Kirkus Reviews

GEORGE WASHINGTON’S SECRET SPY WAR: The Making of America’s First Spymaster by John A. Nagy
The untold story of how George Washington, a Virginia farmer, became the eighteenth century’s greatest and America’s first spymaster. “Drawing on Washington’s correspondence and diary, the late Nagy, an American Revolution specialist, follows Washington from his participation in the French and Indian Wars, where he cut his teeth in the ways of espionage, to his great deception in the American Revolution that secured colonial victory. Nagy’s fast-paced chronicle reveals a little-known side of America’s Revolutionary War hero.” — Publishers Weekly

AMERICAN TREASURES: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Gettysburg Address by Stephen Puleo
Puleo tells the dramatic, never-before-told history of America’s efforts to protect important founding documents, plus the key role played by Librarian of Congress Archibald MacLeish during WWII. “An engrossing account of the creation, consecration, and conservation of the documents that defined American democracy. Readers will take away a new appreciation for the vision and savvy of government officials in finding ways to insure such treasures would survive.”
Library Journal

Starred Nonfiction Roundup

We’re seeing stars for these books about travel, history, art, poetry, and music!

THE GLAMOUR OF STRANGENESS: Artists and the Last Age of the Exotic by Jamie James
A PW Best Summer Books of 2016 pick with THREE starred reviews! “In this exciting book, novelist and critic James examines six artists (and many interesting secondary figures) whose travels allowed them to find inspiration and belonging far from their homelands in locations across the globe. [THE GLAMOUR OF STRANGENESS] is a sharp, thought-provoking contribution to the ongoing conversation about transculturation.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“[A] richly detailed, absorbing cultural history… Abundant primary sources inform James’ sharply drawn, sympathetic portraits.” Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“James is merrily entertaining in his exceptional erudition and nimble eloquence, and fluently and movingly insightful in his psychological, sexual, social, and aesthetic interpretations as he tells these astonishing, often tragic tales of intrepid self-creation and ardently chosen homelands.”Booklist, starred review

LOOK: POEMS by Solmaz Sharif
A July 2016 Indie Next pick! “In form, content, and execution, Sharif’s debut is arguably the most noteworthy book of poetry yet about recent U.S.-led wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and the greater Middle East.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“In these raw, unsparing poems, Rona Jaffe Award winner Sharif closes the gap, making language itself the issue as she investigates the consequences—particularly for herself and her family—of America’s invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq (“My life in the American/ Dream is a DOWNGRADE”). Highly recommended.” — Library Journal, starred review
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