Articles tagged "Adrienne Celt"

Sneak Peek: June 2018 Indie Next List

Three Macmillan titles made the June 2018 Indie Next List!

SHELTER IN PLACE by Nora Roberts
One of Publishers Weekly’s Spring 2018 Literary Fiction picks! “Roberts’ latest polished novel delivers all the literary touchstones her fans have come to expect, including high-stakes suspense, a generous dollop of romance, a thoughtful exploration of the strong bonds of family and friendship that women create for themselves, and, of course, some HGTV fixer-upper moments. As a significant bonus, the book’s chilling, brutal opening scenes should be required reading for any politician waffling on the issue of gun control.” — Booklist readmoreremove

PW’s Spring 2018 Literary Fiction Picks

Publishers Weekly‘s Spring 2018 literary fiction picks include 8 titles from Macmillan:
Top 10

THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
Hannah’s novel, starred by PW, follows the Allbright family, who barely make ends meet, as they move from 1974 Seattle to the untamed wilderness of Kaneq, Alaska, to claim a parcel of land left to the father by a slain Army buddy.

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
Following OUTLINE and TRANSIT, this novel completes Cusk’s trilogy: a woman writer visits a Europe in flux, where questions of personal and political identity rise to the surface.

THE PARKING LOT ATTENDANT by Nafkote Tamirat
Tamirat’s debut is a coming-of-age story about a girl in Boston’s tightly knit Ethiopian community who falls under the influence of a charismatic hustler. The novel received a starred PW review. readmoreremove

Libraries in the News

Woe to the person who says, “Libraries are dead.”

Remember back in October when the U.K.’s New York Observer columnist Andre Walker claimed no one goes to public libraries any more?

(It ended with Walker conceding, “Your sheer numbers have proved the point that libraries aren’t as unpopular as I believed this morning. Please stop replying. I surrender.”)

Our own Con Lehane wrote an op ed in Huffington Post about libraries and privacy issues.

In my most recent book, MURDER IN THE MANUSCRIPT ROOM, one of the characters, a librarian, says after discovering she’d been under surveillance in the library and elsewhere, “Everybody’s spying on everybody.”

You’d think no institution in the nation cares much about privacy protections anymore. But you’d be wrong. There’s at least one place in the nation’s cities, towns, and most villages that respects our privacy. Public libraries care passionately about protecting the confidentiality of library users.

readmoreremove

css.php