Articles tagged "Adam Nicolson"

February 2018 Nonfiction

Nature, history, humor, and sex—just a few of the subjects in this month’s new nonfiction releases:

THE SEABIRD’S CRY: The Lives and Loves of the Planet’s Great Ocean Voyagers by Adam Nicolson
THREE starred reviews! “Marveling at lives lived in some of the harshest places on the planet, Nicolson writes lyrically of birds most of us only briefly notice when visiting a rocky shoreline, beings possessing extraordinary forms of understanding we have never shared.” Booklist, starred review

THE KINGS OF BIG SPRING: God, Oil, and One Family’s Search for the American Dream by Bryan Mealer
Two starred reviews! An indelible portrait of a family through three generations of boom and bust, and a legacy of fortune and ruin as big as Texas itself. “In his themes and vivid storytelling, Mealer invites comparison to James Mitchener (TEXAS) or J.D. Vance (HILLBILLY ELEGY). As tribute to the grit of the rural poor, as social history of dirt-and-oil Texas, and as rambunctious family saga, this work triumphs.” — Library Journal, starred review

LEFT BANK: Art, Passion, and the Rebirth of Paris, 1940-50 by Agnes Poirier
A lively, authoritative group portrait of some of the 20th century’s most revered creative minds as they lived, loved, fought, and flourished in Paris during and after World War II. “This book defies simple description; part collective biography, part cultural history, it aims to make the generation of intellectuals who shaped the Paris of the 1940s familiar to readers. For Francophiles and informed readers interested in 20th-century cultural trends.” — Library Journal

OPERATION CHAOS: The Vietnam Deserters Who Fought the CIA, the Brainwashers, and Themselves by Matthew Sweet
An untold Cold War story about how the CIA tried to infiltrate a radical group of U.S. military deserters; a tale that leads from a bizarre political cult to the heart of the Washington establishment. “A surprising, tragic, and, in many places, angry story of a country’s paranoia inflicting itself upon its own citizens.” — Booklist readmoreremove

PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018

Publishers Weekly‘s “Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018” include these 8 Macmillan titles:
Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror

THE MERRY SPINSTER by Mallory Ortberg
Ortberg’s twisted variations on popular fairy tales and children’s books are daring and skillful, and this outstanding collection of them brims with satirical horror.

WITCHMARK by C.L. Polk
This stellar debut, set in an alternate early 20th century, is an innovative mix of class struggle, magic, and war that marks Polk as a writer to watch.

Poetry

WADE IN THE WATER by Tracy K. Smith
The current U.S. poet laureate challenges the nature of citizenship, motherhood, and what it means to be an artist in a culture mediated by wealth, men, and violence.

Comics/Graphic Novels

BLAME THIS ON THE BOOGIE by Rina Ayuyang
Ayuyang chronicles the real-life adventures of a Filipino-American girl born in the decade of disco who escapes life’s hardships and mundanity through the genre’s feel-good song-and-dance numbers.

Memoir

EAT THE APPLE by Matt Young
This bold memoir explores “how war transformed [Young] from a confused teenager into a dangerous and damaged man.”

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey
The former FBI director shares for the first time the details of his career in government during the past two decades. readmoreremove

January 2018 All-Stars

These forthcoming books are raking in the starred reviews—make sure to add them to your library’s shelves ASAP!

THE PARKING LOT ATTENDANT by Nafkote Tamirat
“Tamirat’s razor-sharp prose fashions a magnificently dimensional and emotionally resonant narrator, herself a storyteller who frames her own tale with beguiling skill. This debut is remarkable in every way.” — Booklist, starred review

“Tamirat’s wonderful debut novel weaves growing pains, immigrant troubles, and moments of biting humor. The unsettling conclusion serves as a perfect ending for this riveting coming-of-age story full of murky motives, deep emotion, and memorable characters.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

GODS OF HOWL MOUNTAIN by Taylor Brown
“Brown immerses the reader in the mountain landscape… [his] dialogue, too, is magical, capturing the local idioms and cadences and rendering them musical. Brown has quickly established himself in the top echelon of Southern writers, and his latest will please readers of Wiley Cash and Ron Rash.” — Booklist, starred review

“Not to be missed, this bold, dark, gritty novel is another coup for Brown, whose lyrical descriptions of the landscape only add to the captivating story of indomitable but isolated folks bound by folklore, tradition, and a hardscrabble life.”Library Journal, starred review

MEMENTO PARK by Mark Sarvas
“Sarvas couples a suspenseful mystery with nuanced meditations on father-son bonds, the intricacies of identity, the aftershocks of history’s horrors, and the ways people and artworks can—perhaps even must—be endlessly reinterpreted. ” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Because of its scope and deft handling of aspects of identity in matters of love, family, religion, and loss, this literary work is highly recommended to the broadest audience.” — Library Journal, starred review

WHISKEY by Bruce Holbert
“[An] impressive novel… Like Cormac McCarthy, another bard of the modern West’s brutality, Holbert finds beauty and cruelty in the land, in the tease and punch of eloquently elliptical dialogue, and in the way humans struggle for love, self-knowledge, and a grip on life. A gut-punch of a bleak family saga that satisfies on many levels.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Holbert returns with a violent, gruesome, and beautiful tale that, despite its despondency, is perversely winning. The violence in this rangy, brilliant narrative is often grotesque, but this excess is tempered by dry humor, wonderful dialogue, and dark wisdom.” Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (11/10/15 Edition)

Hang ​the ​balloons​, toss the confetti and cut the cake—it’s time for a #BookBday party!

A WILD SWAN by Michael Cunningham, illustrated by Yuko Shimizu
A November 2015 LibraryReads pick and a December 2015 Indie Next pick!
Classic fairy tales are reimagined for our times by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of THE HOURS and exquisitely illustrated by Yuko Shimizu. “The original tales are timeless for good reasons, and by approaching them from a fresh and astute perspective with humor and compassion, Cunningham revitalizes their profound resonance. Imaginatively illustrated by Yuko Shimizu, this is a dazzling twenty-first-century fairy-tale collection of creative verve and keen enchantment.”
Booklist, starred review

THINGS I CAN’T EXPLAIN by Mitchell Kriegman
“Kriegman, who created the popular 1990s Nickelodeon series Clarissa Explains It All, revisits his winsome heroine, now an aspiring journalist in her twenties living in New York City. With plenty of references to satisfy fans of the show, Kriegman’s novel will also appeal to readers seeking a fun, breezy read with a lovable leading lady.” — Booklist

THE BIG GREEN TENT by Ludmila Ulitskaya
Two starred reviews for this absorbing novel of dissident life in the Soviet Union, by one of Russia’s most popular writers. “Worthy of shelving alongside Doctor Zhivago: memorable and moving.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review
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Happy EARLY #BookBday! (11/17/14)

Good morning lovely librarians!  Please help us celebrate an early #bookbday for:

THE PARIS WINTER by Imogen Robertson

A December 2014 IndieNext List Selection!

“With a twisty, well-crafted plot, this novel is rich in historical detail and robust with personality.”–Kirkus (starred review)

“For readers of historical fiction looking for a complex story, this is a sure bet and most likely the next big hit of any book discussion group.”–Library Journal

WHY HOMER MATTERS by Adam Nicolson

“[A] gracefully written and deeply informed book…Nicolson’s spirited exploration illuminates our own indelible past.”–Kirkus (starred review)

“In this passionate, deeply personal book, Nicolson explains why Homer matters—to him, to you, to the world—in a text full of twists, turns, and surprises.”–Publishers Weekly

MEN: Notes from an Ongoing Investigation by Laura Kipnis

“Kipnis’s gifts are on full display in this irresistible collection of essays, in which she weaves together complex and penetrating insights about gender into provocative treatises… Kipnis has given us a necessary, and often witty, book that shows a brilliant, agile mind at work.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review)

MANDELA: My Prisoner, My Friend by Christo Brand with Barbara Jones

“[Brand] paints a vivid picture of prison life in South Africa at the time, with its racial discrimination—no bread was given to black prisoners—and the guards’ own isolation from news of the outside world. The central focus of this extraordinary book, however, is a remarkable friendship that bridged age, race, and politics, as Mandela went from prisoner to secret negotiator, and eventually became a revered president.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review & Pick of the Week)

 

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